Super Mario Bros.: The Lost Levels

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A Lakitu holding a Spotlight from Mario & Luigi: Superstar Saga This article has been chosen to be a focus for this month's edition of The 'Shroom Spotlight. Be sure to read about our goals for the article, and help to contribute in any way that you can.
This article is about the game called "Super Mario Bros. 2" in Japanese. For the game given that title elsewhere (named Super Mario USA in Japanese), see Super Mario Bros. 2.
Super Mario Bros.: The Lost Levels
International box art for Super Mario Bros.: The Lost Levels, from Nintendo Switch Online
Western cover art from Nintendo Switch Online
For alternate box art, see the game's gallery.
Developer Nintendo EAD
Publisher Nintendo
Platform(s) Family Computer Disk System, Game Boy Advance, Virtual Console (Wii, 3DS, Wii U), Nintendo Entertainment System - Nintendo Switch Online
Release date Family Computer Disk System:
Japan June 3, 1986[1][2]
Game Boy Advance:
Japan August 10, 2004
Virtual Console (Wii):
Japan May 1, 2007
Europe September 14, 2007
Australia September 14, 2007
USA October 1, 2007
Virtual Console (3DS):
Japan July 25, 2012
USA December 27, 2012
Europe December 27, 2012
Australia December 27, 2012
South Korea July 6, 2016
Virtual Console (Wii U):
Japan August 8, 2013
Europe January 23, 2014
Australia January 23, 2014
USA March 13, 2014
Nintendo Entertainment System - Nintendo Switch Online:
Japan April 10, 2019[3]
USA April 10, 2019[4]
Europe April 10, 2019
Australia April 10, 2019
HK April 23, 2019
South Korea April 23, 2019
Language(s) English (United States)
Genre 2D Platformer
Rating(s)
ESRB:E - Everyone
PEGI:3 - Three years and older
CERO:A - All ages
ACB:G - General
USK:0 - All ages
Mode(s) Single-player
Format
FDS:
Disk Card
Wii:
Digital download
Wii U:
Digital download
Nintendo Switch:
Digital download
Game Boy Advance:
Game Pak
Nintendo 3DS:
Digital download
Input
NES:
Wii:
Wii Remote (horizontal)
Wii U:
Wii Remote (horizontal)
Nintendo Switch:
Game Boy Advance:
Nintendo 3DS:
Serial code(s) FMC-SMB

Super Mario Bros.: The Lost Levels, also known as Super Mario Bros. 2, and alternatively Super Mario Bros. 2: For Super Players in the Japanese version of Super Mario All-Stars and Super Mario Bros. for Super Players in Super Mario Bros. Deluxe, is a direct sequel to the NES game Super Mario Bros. It is the second entry in the Super Mario series.[5]

The game was initially released in 1986 for the Japan-only Family Computer Disk System. It uses a slightly altered version of Super Mario Bros.'s engine, with some new features, altered graphics and new enemy behavior, and different, significantly more challenging levels. Nintendo of America originally deemed this game too difficult and too much like the original to sell well in Western countries, so in order to prevent the early series being associated with frustration and staleness, it adapted Yume Kōjō: Doki Doki Panic and released it as Super Mario Bros. 2. This game was later released in Japan under the title Super Mario USA.

The first time this game was released outside of Japan was its remake in Super Mario All-Stars, where it gained the title Super Mario Bros.: The Lost Levels in 1993. Then, as part of Super Mario Bros. Deluxe, it was redone and renamed Super Mario Bros. for Super Players. The original unaltered release was not available worldwide until the debut of the Virtual Console, over two decades later.

Story[edit]

The story of Super Mario Bros.: The Lost Levels is identical to the first game and is said to be set in a "parallel world" to it.[2][6] The following text is translated from the Japanese instruction booklet.[7]

One day, the peaceful kingdom where Mushrooms live was invaded by the tribe of the huge turtle Koopa, whom possesses powerful magic. Said magical power transformed all the quiet Mushroom People into rocks, bricks and horsetails among other forms, and the Mushroom Kingdom fell into ruin.

The only one who can undo this magic on the Mushrooms and revive them is the Mushroom Kingdom's own Princess Peach. She is presently in the hands of King Koopa.

Mario has stood up to defeat the Turtle Tribe, rescue Princess Peach, and rebuild the peaceful Mushroom Kingdom.

The Mario in the TV is you. Only you can bring this adventure quest (expedition) to a conclusion.

Gameplay[edit]

The title screen for Super Mario Bros.: The Lost Levels
The title screen of Super Mario Bros.: The Lost Levels.

Super Mario Bros.: The Lost Levels is divided into 13 new worlds of the Mushroom Kingdom, each of which have four levels like in Super Mario Bros. Mario and Luigi have to get to the end of the level by jumping over various gaps and avoiding or defeating the members of the Turtle Empire on their way. The Mario Bros. can use several platforms (some of them collapse when Mario or Luigi lands on them), stairs in the level, as well as Jumping Boards. There are also Warp Pipes along the way, some of which Mario can enter to visit various secret coin rooms before returning to the level, a bit further ahead than when he left. At the end of each level, a castle stands with a flagpole nearby. When Mario reaches the flagpole, he takes down the enemy flag and enters the castle, completing the level. The higher the spot that Mario hits the flagpole, the more points he receives.

Unlike Super Mario Bros., Super Mario Bros.: The Lost Levels does not have two-player mode in the game. Mario or Luigi has to be played alone. Mario retains the same abilities as Super Mario Bros., but Luigi returns with the ability to jump higher than Mario can (which is retained in Super Mario Bros. 2 and some other Super Mario games). On the downside, Luigi has slippery traction, so he could prove to be unruly at times.

Super Mario Bros.: The Lost Levels includes the same enemies from Super Mario Bros.: Goombas, Koopa Troopas, Buzzy Beetles, Koopa Paratroopas, Bullet Bills, Hammer Brothers, and leaping Cheep Cheeps. All these enemies can be defeated when Mario jumps on them once, except for Koopa Troopas and Buzzy Beetles, which now run faster than in Super Mario Bros. and hide in their shell when jumped on, which Mario can kick to defeat other enemies and hit blocks or bricks. Koopa Paratroopas lose their wings and fall to the ground when Mario or Luigi jumps on them. Other enemies include Piranha Plants (including new red Piranha Plants, which have replaced green ones in later games) found in pipes, the Spiny-throwing Lakitus and the Hammer Brothers. There are a few levels which take place underwater. In the water, Mario can swim freely from the top to the bottom of the screen. The enemies in underwater levels are Bloopers and Cheep Cheeps, with the inclusion of Goombas, Koopa Troopas, Buzzy Beetles, Koopa Paratroopas, Hammer Brothers, Lava Bubbles, Fire-Bars, and Piranha Plants; Mario can only defeat these creatures by shooting them with fireballs. In some levels, Bloopers are found floating in the air.

Backwards Warp Zone in World 3-1 of Super Mario Bros.: The Lost Levels

Mario or Luigi can get special power-ups out of ?s or, uncommonly, bricks. Most of the ?s in which Mario can find these items are visible, but some are hidden and only become visible when hit from below. With the Super Mushroom, he turns into Super Mario. As Super Mario, he can survive the hit of an enemy one time, at the cost of turning back to Small Mario. He may also destroy empty bricks by jumping beneath them. Lost Levels introduces a harmful version of the Super Mushroom, the new Poison Mushrooms, which injure Mario or Luigi by simply touching one. Additionally, he can also get the Fire Flower. With the Fire Flower, Super Mario turns into Fire Mario, which allows him to shoot fireballs at enemies to defeat them from a distance. With the 1-Up Mushroom, he gains a life; he can also get an extra life by collecting 100 coins. With the rarest item of all, the Super Star (which can only be found in bricks), Mario turns invincible for short of time and can kill enemies by touching them. As with Super Mario Bros., with the exception of coins, only one item can appear on the screen, and when a new item appears, the previous one will disappear.

If Mario takes a hit or Poison Mushroom while Small, falls down a pit, or if the Time Limit runs out, he loses a life and restarts the level. The point where Mario continues depends on his progress through the level before getting defeated; either from the beginning, or at one of several invisible "checkpoints" throughout the level.

The fourth level of each world plays inside a castle. They are usually filled with Fire-Bars and Lava Bubbles. At the end of a castle level, Mario is confronted with a fake Bowser in every world except World 8, where the real Bowser is confronted. To defeat a fake Bowser or the real Bowser, Mario has to either touch the axe to destroy the bridge, causing either the fake Bowser or the real Bowser to fall into the lava, or hit Bowser with a number of fireballs, which produces the same result and reveals the true forms of the fakes.

After defeating a fake Bowser, Mario frees one of the seven Toads from the castle, at which point they say their iconic sentence: "Thank you Mario/Luigi! But our princess is in another castle!" and Mario proceeds to the next world. At the end of the castle in World 8, Mario or Luigi frees the grateful Princess Peach and completes the adventure.

Unlike the first game, there are hidden worlds to discover. Playing through the game without warping forward takes the player to the Fantasy World. Completing the game eight times also unlocks Worlds A-D, with Princess Peach waiting to be rescued from a fake Bowser (the actual Bowser in Super Mario All-Stars version) in the last level.

Differences and additional features[edit]

Although the mechanics in Super Mario Bros.: The Lost Levels adhere closely to those of Super Mario Bros., the game does feature some significant changes and additions.

Graphical and sound additions and changes[edit]

  • The background graphics, block tiles, and ground tiles are different (mountains now have jagged slopes, cloud and bushes have faces, horsehair plants/trees are now segmented, fences and lifts are now mushrooms, ground is rockier, bricks have shading, etc.).
  • Mushroom sprites (including Super Mushrooms, Poison Mushrooms, and 1-Up Mushrooms) are changed to have eyes, a feature that has stuck with the franchise since.
  • The giant mushroom platforms (found in 4-3 and the 4-2 Warp Zone of Super Mario Bros.) are changed into a new cloud shape that is not found in any other port of any of the 8-bit Super Mario games, and form the level theme of World 8-3 and World A-3 (actual Super Mario Bros.: The Lost Levels-style mushroom platforms would appear in All Night Nippon: Super Mario Bros., where they now have segmented stalks). Similarly, the grass platforms found in every other third level except for World D-4 now have a fringe-like appearance.
  • A skidding sound for Mario and Luigi's sliding is added. This would later be reused in Super Mario Bros. 3.
  • An animation when Mario comes out of a pipe into water is added.
  • Shadows are added to the text font.
  • Digits are one pixel shorter than the ones in the original game, and the "0" is shaped like the "O", rather than the rounder, slanted version seen originally. VS. Super Mario Bros. and All Night Nippon: Super Mario Bros. also use the Super Mario Bros.: The Lost Levels font, while Super Mario Bros. Special retains the Super Mario Bros. font.
  • The "Ending" theme has a second verse four steps above the original pitch, and uses the FDS's hardware capabilities to make it richer in sound. It was first composed as the ending theme of Super Mario Bros., before being shortened due to storage limitations.[8] A similar version appeared earlier in VS. Super Mario Bros.
  • Princess Peach is given a new sprite.

New game features[edit]

  • Poison Mushrooms are introduced. Touching one is equivalent to colliding with an enemy, except the mushroom is consumed as usual. They can be found in either ?s or invisible blocks. Their color palette matches the Goombas of that level (brown on overworlds, blue in undergrounds, gray in castles).
  • Red Piranha Plants are introduced, a more aggressive variant of the usual green Piranha Plant that attacks even if the player is standing next to their pipe. They stop attacking only if the player is anywhere above the pipe (except if on the two outermost pixels of its edges). These first appear in World 4.
  • Upside-down pipes are introduced, appearing first in World 5.
  • Red Piranha Plants may be found in upside-down pipes. They attack and retreat more frequently than those in right-side up pipes, and there is no way to stop them from attacking (since the player cannot stand on top of their pipe; they continue to attack even if the player stands directly underneath their pipe). These also appear in underwater stages.
  • A strong wind blows in certain parts of some levels. It usually blows the player forward, enabling longer jumps but making it difficult to space them.
  • While the original Super Mario Bros. only had three Warp Zone areas, Super Mario Bros.: The Lost Levels features a total of 11, all of which have only one destination pipe. Two of them are fake, and now take Mario back to a previous world: 3-1 to 1-1 and 8-1 to 5-1. Like World 4-2 of the original game, some levels have more than one Warp Zone location.
  • Two-player mode has been removed, and the player can instead choose between Mario and Luigi on the title screen. Mario controls as in Super Mario Bros., while Luigi can jump higher than Mario, but has significantly worse traction. These characteristics would be carried over to many future Super Mario games, including Super Mario Galaxy, Super Mario Galaxy 2, Super Mario 3D Land, and Super Mario 3D World.
  • If the player beats the game while completing all 32 of the game's standard levels without using any Warp Zones, they unlock World 9, a secret world. They have only one life to complete it with: if they fail, they are brought back to the main menu after getting a special Game Over message, and if they succeed, the world loops back on itself upon completion, meaning they can keep playing it until they die or decide to quit the game. The world features bizarre underwater landscapes not found in any other level, such as an underwater Goal Pole and castle. In the Super Mario All-Stars remake, the player may keep any lives they had left after World 8-4. All secret worlds were removed in the Super Mario Bros. Deluxe port.
  • In the original version and Virtual Console releases, the game adds a star on the title screen each time the player beats World 8-4. The number of stars the player earns is saved on the disk, and the title card can display up to 24 stars.
  • If the player earns a total of eight stars on the title card, they can unlock four more secret worlds, Worlds A through D, by holding the A Button button at the title screen (or the B Button button in the GBA version) before pressing Start. In the Super Mario All-Stars re-release, the levels may be accessed after just one successful playthrough, beginning automatically after World 8-4 (or 9-4 if the player unlocks World 9). All secret worlds were removed in the Super Mario Bros. Deluxe port.
  • Green Super Springs are introduced, appearing in Worlds 2, 3, 7, B, and C. These bounce Mario/Luigi so high that he disappears from view for several seconds, allowing the player to cover great distances without touching the ground but also making it very difficult to track his trajectory.

Tweaked game features[edit]

  • A significant physics modification is added: Mario now bounces much higher after stomping on an enemy, and Luigi bounces even higher than Mario now does. This extra height is sometimes critical to clearing large gaps. If Mario or Luigi manages to stomp the top of an enemy while moving upwards at the right trajectory, the changed physics cause them to soar very high, sometimes off the top of the screen. This "Super Jump" would later be properly introduced in Super Mario Bros. 3.
  • Invisible blocks may now hold any kind of power-up (instead of solely 1-Up Mushrooms, like in Super Mario Bros.), including Poison Mushrooms. These are either put in secret areas to aid the player, or (in the case of Poison Mushrooms) sometimes placed in locations easy to accidentally hit in order to obstruct the player.
  • Bloopers can float above water. They behave the same way they do underwater and can be stomped for 1000 points.
  • Koopa Troopas (and more rarely, a few other enemies) can be found in the water in some levels, such as World 3-2. They walk more slowly than usual and like other underwater enemies, cannot be stomped (Mario/Luigi instead take damage; they cannot be defeated without a Fire Flower or Super Star). Due to the palettes assigned to the underwater stages, the green enemies appear gray (they are still colored normally in the Super Mario All-Stars version). Additionally, this also renders underwater Buzzy Beetles invincible, as Buzzy Beetles cannot be defeated with fireballs, and cannot be stomped underwater.
  • The "right path, wrong path" system now occurs in some non-castle levels, looping the level until the correct path is chosen. These levels include World 5-3 and World 7-2.
  • In Worlds 7 and 8, Hammer Brothers now continuously charge forward while still throwing Hammers, making them extremely difficult to dodge. If Mario passes over them, they turn around and then behave normally (they continue to jump and throw hammers, but no longer run). In Super Mario All-Stars, this behavior also occurs in Worlds A-D. Hammer Brothers also occasionally appear underwater.
  • Lakitus now sometimes appear underwater, along with Spinies. In certain levels, they also appear at lower altitudes, making them easier to stomp.
  • An unusually-colored version of Bowser can be found in the corridors of two castles. He has a darker, greenish blue coloration, similar to Koopa Troopas and Piranha Plants found in cave or castle levels, and does not stand on a bridge over lava. The player can avoid this Bowser without defeating him. In the Super Mario All-Stars version, encountering this enemy cues the SNES-exclusive boss music until finishing the level. These palette changes are due to not being close to the axe, where the overworld green palette is used instead. Unlike the fake Bowsers in Worlds 1-7 and Worlds A-C, these do not change into generic enemies when defeated (with five Fireballs as usual); they will still look like the real Bowser.
  • Beanstalk vines can lead to not only a Coin Heaven or a Warp Zone, but even to the flagpole.
  • Luigi's increased jump height sometimes enables him to jump over the Goal Pole. In a few cases, this leads to a Warp Zone beyond the pole; in most other cases, the screen simply stops scrolling after the pole. It is no longer possible to get stuck behind the Goal Pole like it was in the original Super Mario Bros.
  • Fireworks are no longer triggered by having the last digit of the timer be 1, 3, or 6, but rather by having the last digit of the timer match the last digit of the coin counter. Additionally, if both digits of the coin counter match the last digit of the timer, Mario/Luigi receives a 1-Up.
  • In overworld and underground levels, some Piranha Plant pipes are now flush with the floor rather than extending above it, making them more difficult to notice and avoid.
  • In addition to the obvious Poison Mushrooms, many actual power-ups are now traps: in castles with ceilings, a Super Mushroom may make Mario too tall to make some long jumps (as his head hits the ceiling and causes him to fall into a pit or lava); and in athletic levels, a Super Star may prevent Mario from stomping atop Koopa Paratroopas in midair to complete some extra long jumps (causing him to fall into the pit below).
  • Holding A+Start on the title screen is no longer a continue code; instead, the player is directly given the option to Continue on the Game Over screen, and cannot return to the title screen without being forced to restart from World 1-1. (As the secret World 9's Game Over screen features a special message in place of any options, the player effectively cannot use any continues at all in that world; this does not hold true in Super Mario All-Stars.)
    • In the GBA version, holding A+Start on the title screen once again allows the player to continue, but only from Worlds 1 to 8. This is saved (along with their high score) even when the game is powered off, if the player saves their high score beforehand. This change also makes it possible to switch between Mario or Luigi without having to restart on World 1, which was not possible in the FDS version.
  • After beating the game, pressing B on the title screen no longer allows the player to start from any world, and there is no "new quest" where the player travels through the same levels but with tougher enemies. (The latter is essentially replaced by the secret worlds A-D.)
    • The Game & Watch: Super Mario Bros. version of the game restores the world selection feature, allowing the player to access the highest world achieved in gameplay and all prior ones. Unlocking World A only does not unlock World 9 on the world select feature.
  • A new ending cutscene, reused from VS. Super Mario Bros., is included: After Bowser (or Fake Bowser in World D) is defeated, Mario/Luigi finds Peach inside a separate room instead of simply being in the area behind the Bowser battle bridge, who then thanks him by reciting a poem, followed by the sky lighting up and turning blue and the seven Toads Mario/Luigi rescued earlier on reappearing and circling him and Peach (five of them are depicted floating in mid-air) and exclaiming "Thank you[sic] Mario/Luigi!" Much like the case with Bowser's wristbands, the ending cutscene confirms the fact that Peach and the Toads' eyes appearing as black pixels is due to them actually being transparent and formed from the background color due to the NES' color palette being limited to having just three colors each. The ending is also reused after completing World D-4, despite Mario/Luigi only rescuing just three Toads there, as well as in All Night Nippon: Super Mario Bros., where all of the Toads are replaced with caricatures of celebrities (again, even in World D-4) and Peach dressed as a geisha. In Super Mario All-Stars version, however, the ending is the same as the altered ending in the All-Stars version of Super Mario Bros., which instead features Mario rescuing Peach from a cage suspended over lava.

Controls[edit]

Action(s) Famicom Controller / Famicom Mini Controller / Nintendo Switch Online NES Controller Game Boy Advance Nintendo GameCube Controller Wii Remote Wii Classic Controller Nintendo 3DS Wii U GamePad / Wii U Pro Controller (default) Nintendo Switch (Dual Joy-Con / Pro Controller) Nintendo Switch (Single Joy-Con)
Move; change position on a beanstalk +Control Pad (left and right) +Control Pad left or right Control Stick (left and right) or +Control Pad (left and right) +Control Pad left or right Classic Controller Left Stick (left and right) or +Control Pad left or right Circle Pad (left and right) or +Control Pad left or right Left Stick (left and right) or +Control Pad left or right Left Stick (left and right) or Directional Buttons (left and right) Control Stick (left and right)
Duck; enter Warp Pipe +Control Pad (down) +Control Pad (down) Control Stick (down) or +Control Pad (down) +Control Pad down Classic Controller Left Stick (down) or +Control Pad down Circle Pad (down) or +Control Pad down Left Stick (down) or +Control Pad down Left Stick (down) or Directional Buttons (down) Control Stick (down)
Climb beanstalk +Control Pad (up and down) +Control Pad (up and down) Control Stick (up and down) or +Control Pad (up and down) +Control Pad up or down Classic Controller Left Stick (up and down) or +Control Pad up or down Circle Pad (up and down) or +Control Pad up or down Left Stick (up and down) or +Control Pad up or down Left Stick (up and down) or Directional Buttons (up and down) Control Stick (up and down)
Jump; swim upwards A Button A Button A Button Two Button Classic Controller a Button A Button A Button A Button Single Joy-Con Right Button
Dash; throw fireball B Button B Button B Button One Button Classic Controller b Button B Button B Button B Button Single Joy-Con Bottom Button or Single Joy-Con Top Button
Pause; confirm selected option on title or Game Over screens Start Button Start Button START/PAUSE Button Plus Button Start Button Plus Button Plus Button Plus Button or Minus Button + SR Button
Select options on title or Game Over screens Select Button Select Button Z Button Minus Button Select Button Minus Button Minus Button Plus Button or Minus Button + SL Button
Start World A from title screen (after earning at least 8 stars) Press Start Button while holding down A Button Press Start Button while holding down B Button Press START/PAUSE Button while holding down A Button Press Plus Button while holding down Two Button Press Plus Button while holding down Classic Controller a Button Press Start Button while holding down A Button Press Plus Button while holding down A Button Press Plus Button while holding down A Button Press Plus Button or Minus Button while holding down Single Joy-Con Right Button
Continue in the same world after the Game Over screen N/A Press Start Button while holding down A Button N/A

Characters[edit]

Playable characters[edit]

Unlike the prior game, Mario and Luigi have different physics in Super Mario Bros.: The Lost Levels. Luigi jumps higher, but has worse traction on the ground, making it easier for him to slide off of platforms and fall down pits. The attributes below derives from the Super Mario All-Stars Player's Guide.[9] 1 unit equates to the height or width of a block.

Image Name Jump Dash + jump Slide Description
Super Mario's sprite from Super Mario Bros. Mario 4 5 2 Mario is the main protagonist of the game. His younger twin brother, Luigi, can be selected on the title screen instead. While Luigi is differentiated by his colors, both Fiery Mario and Fiery Luigi have the same palette.
Sprite of Luigi from Super Mario Bros. Luigi 5.5 6 4

Non-playable characters[edit]

Image Name Description
Princess Peach Princess Toadstool The princess of the Mushroom Kingdom. Bowser kidnaps her to prevent her from reversing the magic the Koopa used on the Mushroom People. She appears at the end of World 8-4 and D-4, behind a door.
A Mushroom Retainer from Super Mario Bros. Toads Mushroom People that serve the princess and are imprisoned by Bowser. They are saved after every boss battle except for the ones in 8-4 and D-4. Upon being rescued, a Toad directs Mario onward to the next world.

Enemies and obstacles[edit]

Enemies[edit]

Enemies are generally listed in the order they appear in the instruction booklet, which uniquely includes the Poisonous Mushroom.[10] Their displayed names derive from the Super Mario All-Stars Player's Guide, as Super Mario All-Stars was the first instance that any version of The Lost Levels was officially localized and made widely accessible for English-speaking audiences.[11]

Image Name Description Levels Pts. New
First Last
SMBLL Poison Mushroom Sprite.png Poisonous Mushroom Toxic mushrooms that move like Super Mushrooms. If Mario is in his Super or Fire form, making contact with a Poisonous Mushroom reduces him to his Small form. If already in that form, he loses a life. World 1-1 World D-4 X mark.svg New to the franchise
Sprite of a Goomba from Super Mario Bros. Goomba Mushroom creatures that walk back and forth. Little Goombas are the most common enemies and can be defeated with any attack. World 1-1 World D-2 100
Sprite of a green Koopa Troopa from Super Mario Bros. Green Koopa Troopa Foot soldiers of the Turtle Empire. Stomping on Koopa Troopas make them recede into their shells, which can be kicked to hit defeat enemies. Like Little Goombas, green-shelled Koopa Troopas walk off ledges. World 1-1 World D-2 100
Sprite of a red Koopa Troopa from Super Mario Bros. Red Koopa Troopa Red-shelled Koopa Troopas turn around when the reach the corner of a ledge. World 1-1 World D-3 100
Sprite of a green Koopa Paratroopa from Super Mario Bros. Green Koopa Paratroopa Winged Koopa Troopas. The green ones bounce across the ground or fly back and forth in set paths. World 1-1 World D-4 400
Sprite of a red Koopa Paratroopa from Super Mario Bros. Red Koopa Paratroopa Red Koopa Paratroopas fly up and down in set paths. World 1-3 World D-4 400
A Buzzy Beetle, from Super Mario Bros. Buzzy Beetle Small Koopas that retract into their shells when stomped. Buzzy Beetles are immune to fireballs and replace Little Goombas in Hard Mode. World 1-2 World D-2 100
Sprite of Hammer Bro from Super Mario Bros. Hammer Bro Helmeted Koopas that toss hammers. Hammer Bros periodically hop between rows of blocks. They always occur in pairs. World 3-1 World D-4 1000
Sprite of a Spiny from Super Mario Bros. Spiny Squat, spiked Koopas. Stomping one damages Mario. World 4-1 World C-3 200
Sprite of a Spiny Egg from Super Mario Bros. Spiny Egg The spiked eggs tossed by Lakitus. It hatches into a Spiny when it makes contact with the ground. World 4-1 World C-3 200
Sprite of Lakitu from Super Mario Bros. Lakitu Cloud-riding Koopas. Lakitus toss Spiny's eggs. They appear towards the top of the screen follow Mario's position. World 4-1 World C-3 200
Sprite of a Piranha Plant from Super Mario Bros. Piranha Plant Carnivorous plants that sit in pipes. Piranha Plants emerge and retract from pipes in set internals. If Mario stands directly next to or on these pipes, the plants do not emerge. World 1-1 World 3-4 200
A Red Piranha Plant from Super Mario Bros.: The Lost Levels Red Piranha Plant Red Piranha Plants move quickly and continue emerging from pipes regardless of Mario's relative position. World 4-1 World D-4 200 New to the franchise
Sprite of a red Cheep Cheep from Super Mario Bros. Cheep Cheep (Red) Pudgy pufferfish enemies that swim through water. In some ground-themed courses, red Cheep Cheeps leap over bridges in large numbers. World 2-3 World D-4 200
Sprite of a gray Cheep Cheep from Super Mario Bros. Cheep Cheep (Grey) Grey Cheep Cheeps only occur underwater. They swim slightly faster than the red ones. World 3-2 World B-2 200
Bullet Bill Bullet Bill Missiles launched from Turtle Cannons. They fly in straight lines. Bullet Bills are unaffected by fireballs. World 1-2 World D-3 200
Sprite of a Blooper from Super Mario Bros. Blooper Underwater squid sentinels. They swim erratically to strike Mario. World 3-2 World B-2 200
Blooper sprite. Sky Blooper Pink Bloopers that occur above ground. They behave like the underwater ones, "swimming" through the air. World 1-3 World D-4 200 New to the franchise
Sprite of Podoboo Podoboo Balls of lava that guard Bowser's castles. They leap straight up from pools of lava to strike Mario. World 2-4 World D-4 X mark.svg

Obstacles[edit]

Image Name Description Levels
First Last
Sprite of Bowser's Flame from Super Mario Bros. Bowser's Fireball Flames spewed by Bowser and his imposters. The fire travels horizontally and transcends walls. World 1-4 World 8-4
Sprite of a Fire Bar from Super Mario Bros. Fire-Bar Various fireballs stacked together moving either clockwise or counterclockwise. Their length may vary. World 1-4 World D-4
Sprite tile of lava from Super Mario Bros. Lava Pools of molten rock found within fortresses and castles. Direct contact makes Mario lose a life. World 1-4 World D-4
Bill Blaster sprite. Turtle Cannon Cannons that launch Bullet Bills. Like the pipes that contain Piranha plants, Turtle Cannons do not fire when Mario is next to or on them. World 1-2 World D-3
Sprite of Wind from Super Mario Bros.: The Lost Levels. Wind Strong gusts of wind push Mario back, necessitating the player adjust the timing of his jumps and keep moving him forward. World 5-1 World D-1

Bosses[edit]

Mario facing Bowser's Brother in World 8-4.
Mario and the blue Bowser in World 8-4.

Like the original Super Mario Bros., a boss occurs in the fourth level of each world within the final room of the castle. The only exception is World 9, whose boss is in 9-3 above ground. The boss is on a bridge suspended above a pool of lava. Touching the ax at the opposite corner of the bridge makes it fall away and defeats the boss, but striking one with five fireballs as Fiery Mario defeats it as well. Defeating it this way awards the player with 5000 points. Once defeated, Mario transitions to a narrow corridor where a captive is held. In the first seven worlds, this captive is a Toad that directs Mario further along his journey. In World 8 and D-4, Princess Toadstool is the one rescued. In most boss rooms, Lifts, Normal Blocks, Podoboos, and Fire-Bars appear alongside the boss as well.

Intrinsically, the only boss in the game is Bowser, the fire-breathing King of Koopas who kidnapped the princess. However, Bowser himself only appears at the boss of World 8-4. All of the proceeding and subsequent "Bowsers" are his minions in disguise. In the levels with Bowser, a blue-colored one appears earlier in the level as well as a mid-boss and by himself in 9-3. They all exhibit the same behavior: the large Koopa shuffles back and forth along the bridge, facing Mario, and jumping in small arches. These arches are just high enough that Mario can move underneath Bowser if the opportunity presents itself. The blue-colored Bowser is the only boss encountered off bridges and is defeated only with fireballs.

In the first five worlds and worlds A, B, C, and D, the fake Bowsers spew fire. In the sixth and seventh, they toss hammers like Hammer Bros. The blue-colored one does both in World 8-4, but only tosses hammers in World 9-3 and only breathes fire in World D-4. The real Bowser is the only boss that consistently does both. Like Spinies, Bowser and his lookalikes have spiked shells. Attempting to stomp them damages Mario.

Items and objects[edit]

Items[edit]

Image Name Description
1-Up Mushroom sprite from Super Mario Bros.: The Lost Levels. 1-Up Mushroom Green mushrooms that give Mario an extra life when collected. 1 -Up Mushrooms are within invisible blocks near pits. When one is struck, the mushroom travels across the ground in the opposite direction from Mario.
Sprite of a coin from Super Mario Bros. Coin Coins float in mid-air throughout levels and within blocks. Collecting one awards Mario 200 points. Collecting 100 awards him an extra life.
Green Shell SMB Redshell.png Koopa shell Stomping on a Koopa Troopa makes it recede into its shell. Its sent sliding when touched, defeating enemies on contact. Doing so causes the "bulldozer attack", where each enemy defeated grants Mario more points than the last. Launched shells ricochet off collided walls and can damage Mario on contact.
A Buzzy Shell Buzzy shell Stomping on a Buzzy Beetle yields a shell that works like the Koopa ones, but it cannot be cleared away with tossed fireballs.

Power-ups[edit]

Items that transform Mario's appearance and give him unique abilities. All of these items are held within blocks and must be jumped under to be released. It is not inherently apparent which block contain which power-ups, and breaking them does not grant Mario their abilities. He must touch the power-ups directly once they are expelled. Touching any power-up also awards Mario 1000 points. Forms that share a column look the same for Mario and Luigi.

Power-up Form Description
Mario Luigi
N/A Small Mario sprite from Super Mario Bros.
Small Mario
Luigi's death sprite in Super Mario Bros.
Small Luigi
Mario is in his Small form when the player starts a new game. Small Mario is incapable of breaking Normal Blocks and loses a life when he makes contact with an enemy or obstacle. However, he can run across narrow passageways without having to crouch. Regardless of the form he was in before losing a life, Mario reappears in the level in his Small form.
Super Mushroom sprite from Super Mario Bros.: The Lost Levels.
Mushroom
Super Mario jumping in Super Mario Bros.
Super Mario
Sprite of Luigi from Super Mario Bros.
Super Luigi
Mushrooms are within visible blocks and slide across the ground, similar to 1-Up Mushrooms. They bounce back in the opposite direction when they hit an obstruction. Touching one transforms Small Mario into Super Mario, a form twice as tall and capable of breaking Normal Blocks. Subsequent encounters with blocks intended to contain Mushrooms instead release Fire Flowers when struck in this form. Receiving damaging reverts Super Mario back into his Small form. He retains his Super form across levels if he reaches flagpoles as Super Mario.
Sprite of a Fire Flower from Super Mario Bros.
Fire Flower
SMB Fire Mario Sprite.png
Fiery Mario / Luigi
Making contact with a Fire Flower transforms Mario into Fiery Mario. In this form, Mario can toss projectile fireballs with A Button that bounce along the ground. Most enemies are defeated when hit. Fiery Mario also has all the benefits of Super Mario, and similarly retains this form if he completes the level in it. As in the original Famicom release of the first Super Mario Bros., Mario reverts to his Small form if hit as Fiery Mario.
Sprite of a Starman from Super Mario Bros.
Star
Invincible Mario in Super Mario Bros.
Invincible Mario / Luigi
Stars are rare power-ups often hidden in invisible blocks. When released, they bounce in the opposite direction from Mario. When grabbed, Mario is transformed into Invincible Mario for thirty seconds. In this state, Mario is largely indestructible and defeats enemies on contact. Contact with the Star does not wholly replace the form Mario was already in (i.e., Mario remains small if one is touched while in his Small form, and he can still toss fireballs if he is in his Fiery form.) Invincible Mario cannot be carried over to subsequent levels.

Objects[edit]

Objects are interactable elements of the environment that cannot be picked up or collected.

Image Name Description
Blocks
An static ? Block from Super Mario Bros. (Overworld palette) ? Block Floating blocks that contain items. One releases its contents when jumped underneath. Some ? Blocks are 10 Coin Blocks that release up to 10 coins if struck in rapid succession. Others are invisible. A struck ? Block becomes an Empty Block that can be used as a platform. These are the only type of strikable blocks that Small Mario can open.
Sprite of a Cloud Block from Super Mario Bros. Cloud Block Cloud Blocks make up the terrain in Bonus Stages high in the athletic levels.
Sprite of Coral from Super Mario Bros. Coral Coral form varyingly sized columns in underwater levels that obstruct Mario.
Sprite of a Brick Block from Super Mario Bros.: The Lost Levels Normal Block The most common blocks. Most Normal Blocks fall apart when struck, but some are secretly ? or 10 Coin Blocks. Small Mario is incapable of directly breaking a Normal Block, but he can still use a shell if available.
Sprite of a Hard Block from Super Mario Bros. Stairblock Unbreakable blocks that appear on the ground. Some are stacked or laid next to each other to form climbable staircases or incomplete bridges.
Platforms
Sprite of a Cloud Lift from Super Mario Bros.: The Lost Levels. Cloud Inert platforms in the sky.
Sprite of a Lift from Super Mario Bros.: The Lost Levels Lift Thin, moving platforms. They are most common in athletic levels, above bottomless pits. Lifts are of varying widths and movements. There is a paired type of Lifts called Balance Lifts that are a seesaw-like pulley system, where standing on one Lift makes it fall and the other rise. There are also types of Lifts that fall shortly after being stepped on.
Sprite of a Warp Pipe from Super Mario Bros. Pipe Most pipes are columnar platforms of varying height, some of which contain Piranha Plants. A few of them are Warp Pipes that bring Mario to a secret underground area by pressing down on +Control Pad. In some Warp Zones, the Warp Pipes bring Mario back to previously visited worlds.
Sprite of a Springboard in Super Mario Bros.: The Lost Levels Spring Springs bounce Mario into the air. Pressing A Button when the Spring is fully contracted makes it launch Mario much higher than it would otherwise.
Sprite of a Green Springboard from Super Mario Bros.: The Lost Levels Super Spring Green-colored Springs that launch Mario offscreen, enabling him to skip large portions of levels.
Goals
Sprite of an Axe from Super Mario Bros. Ax Touching an ax causes the bridge it is alongside to collapse. This defeats the boss that was on top of it and completes the level.
Door Door Doors become accessible when certain bosses are defeated. They lead to Princess Toadstool.
A flagpole from Super Mario Bros. Flagpole Flagpoles are the goals at the end of most levels. When one is touched, Mario slides to the base and completes the level. Touching one also rewards him bonus points. The higher he is on the flagpole, the greater the number of points. Grabbing the top rewards Mario 5000 points.
Other objects
Sprite of a Firework from Super Mario Bros. Firework Fireworks appear if Mario grabs a flagpole with 1, 3, or 6 as the last digit on the timer. The number of fireworks that go off correlates with this number, and each one rewards Mario 500 points.
A horsehair plant from Super Mario Bros.: The Lost Levels Horsehair plant Field horsehair plants appear in the background of ground-themed levels. According to the instruction booklet, Bowser transformed some of the Mushroom Kingdom's inhabitants into these plants.
Beanstalk Vine Beanstalks rapidly grow from struck Vine Blocks, ascending skyward. Climbing one brings Mario to a hidden Bonus Stage in the sky.

List of levels[edit]

Six levels in the game are reused from VS. Super Mario Bros. Additionally, 22 levels from the game appear in All Night Nippon: Super Mario Bros., including those in Worlds A-D.

World Level Setting Enemies found
SMBLL Luigi Screenshot.png
World 1-1 Overworld Goomba, Koopa Troopa, Koopa Paratroopa, Piranha Plant
World 1-2 Underground Goomba, Koopa Troopa, Piranha Plant, Buzzy Beetle
World 1-3 Athletic Blooper, Koopa Troopa, Koopa Paratroopa
World 1-4 Castle Fire-Bar, Koopa Troopa, fake Bowser
World 2-1
World 2-1 Overworld Goomba, Koopa Troopa, Koopa Paratroopa, Piranha Plant
World 2-2 Overworld Koopa Troopa, Koopa Paratroopa, Goomba, Piranha Plant
World 2-3 Athletic Cheep Cheep, Koopa Troopa, Koopa Paratroopa, Blooper
World 2-4 Castle Koopa Troopa, Goomba, Fire-Bar, Lava Bubble, fake Bowser
World 3-2
World 3-1 Overworld Hammer Brother, Koopa Troopa, Koopa Paratroopa, Bullet Bill, Piranha Plant
World 3-2 Underwater Blooper, Cheep Cheep, Koopa Troopa, Koopa Paratroopa
World 3-3 Athletic Koopa Troopa, Koopa Paratroopa, Piranha Plant
World 3-4 Castle Fire-Bar, Lava Bubble, Piranha Plant, fake Bowser
World 4-1
World 4-1 Overworld Piranha Plant, Lakitu, Spiny
World 4-2 Overworld Koopa Troopa, Piranha Plant, Buzzy Beetle, Lakitu, Spiny, Goomba
World 4-3 Athletic Koopa Paratroopa, Koopa Troopa, Bullet Bill
World 4-4 Castle Fire-Bar, Goomba, Koopa Troopa, Hammer Brother, Piranha Plant, Lava Bubble, fake Bowser
World 5-1
World 5-1 Overworld Buzzy Beetle, Piranha Plant, Koopa Troopa, Koopa Paratroopa, Goomba
World 5-2 Underground Piranha Plant, Goomba, Koopa Troopa, Buzzy Beetle
World 5-3 Athletic Koopa Paratroopa, Piranha Plant, Bullet Bill, Blooper
World 5-4 Castle Lava Bubble, Fire-Bar, fake Bowser
World 6-3
World 6-1 Overworld Piranha Plant, Buzzy Beetle, Koopa Troopa, Koopa Paratroopa, Goomba, Bullet Bill, Hammer Brother, Blooper
World 6-2 Underwater Blooper, Cheep Cheep, Koopa Troopa, Koopa Paratroopa
World 6-3 Athletic Koopa Troopa, Koopa Paratroopa, Cheep Cheep
World 6-4 Castle Lava Bubble, Fire-Bar, Piranha Plant, Hammer Brother, fake Bowser
World 7-3
World 7-1 Overworld Koopa Troopa, Koopa Paratroopa, Piranha Plant, Hammer Brother, Bullet Bill
World 7-2 Overworld/Athletic Blooper, Cheep Cheep, Piranha Plant, Fire-Bar
World 7-3 Athletic Koopa Troopa, Koopa Paratroopa, Piranha Plant, Fire-Bar
World 7-4 Castle Lava Bubble, Fire-Bar, fake Bowser
SMBLL NES World 8-4 Peach.png
World 8-1 Overworld Goomba, Koopa Troopa, Koopa Paratroopa, Piranha Plant, Buzzy Beetle
World 8-2 Overworld Goomba, Koopa Paratroopa, Piranha Plant, Buzzy Beetle, Lakitu, Spiny, Bullet Bill
World 8-3 Athletic Koopa Troopa, Koopa Paratroopa, Piranha Plant, Bullet Bill, Hammer Brother
World 8-4 Castle Goomba, Koopa Paratroopa, Piranha Plant, Fire-Bar, Lava Bubble, Buzzy Beetle, Hammer Brother, Blooper, Cheep Cheep, Bowser's Brother, Bowser
SMB NES World 9-1 Title Card.png
World 9-1 Underwater Piranha Plant, Koopa Paratroopa, Bullet Bill, Lakitu, Spiny, Hammer Brother, Blooper, Buzzy Beetle
World 9-2 Underwater Piranha Plant, Lakitu, Spiny
World 9-3 Overworld Castle Bowser's Brother
World 9-4 Underwater Goomba, Koopa Troopa, Buzzy Beetle, Koopa Paratroopa, Hammer Brother, Blooper, Lava Bubble
World A-1
World A-1 Overworld Koopa Troopa, Koopa Paratroopa, Piranha Plant, Hammer Brother
World A-2 Underground Piranha Plant, Hammer Brother, Bullet Bill
World A-3 Athletic Cheep Cheep, Blooper, Koopa Paratroopa
World A-4 Castle Fire-Bar, Lava Bubble, Koopa Troopa, Bullet Bill, fake Bowser
World B-2
World B-1 Overworld Buzzy Beetle, Koopa Troopa, Piranha Plant, Koopa Paratroopa
World B-2 Underwater Blooper, Cheep Cheep, Koopa Paratroopa, Koopa Troopa, Fire-Bar, Piranha Plant
World B-3 Athletic Koopa Paratroopa, Piranha Plant, Bullet Bill, Koopa Troopa
World B-4 Castle Piranha Plant, Fire-Bar, fake Bowser
Screenshot of World C-3 of Super Mario Bros.: The Lost Levels
World C-1 Overworld Koopa Paratroopa, Piranha Plant, Hammer Brother, Buzzy Beetle
World C-2 Athletic Koopa Paratroopa, Cheep Cheep, Blooper, Koopa Troopa, Bullet Bill
World C-3 Athletic Lakitu, Spiny, Koopa Paratroopa, Piranha Plant, Fire-Bar
World C-4 Castle Fire-Bar, Koopa Troopa, Buzzy Beetle, Lava Bubble, Fake Bowser
World D-2
World D-1 Overworld Hammer Brother, Koopa Paratroopa, Bullet Bill, Buzzy Beetle, Koopa Troopa, Piranha Plant
World D-2 Overworld Koopa Troopa, Buzzy Beetle, Koopa Troopa, Piranha Plant, Bullet Bill
World D-3 Overworld Bullet Bill, Piranha Plant, Hammer Brother, Koopa Paratroopa
World D-4 Castle Piranha Plant, Fire-Bar, Lava Bubble, Koopa Paratroopa, Cheep Cheep, Hammer Brother, Blooper, fake Bowser's Brother (original) / Bowser's Brother (All-Stars), fake Bowser (original) / Bowser (All-Stars)

Development[edit]

“As I continued to play, I found that Super Mario Bros. 2 asked me again and again to take a leap of faith and that each of those leaps resulted in my immediate death. This was not a fun game to play. It was punishment. Undeserved punishment. I put down my controller astonished that Mr. Miyamoto has chosen to design such a painful game.”
Howard Phillips[12]

In an interview, Shigeru Miyamoto stated that Super Mario Bros.: The Lost Levels was made due to how much fun the development team had creating new, difficult levels for VS. Super Mario Bros.[13] Six of the levels in the game (1-4, 2-2, 4-3, 5-4, 6-2, and 6-3) were reused from VS. Super Mario Bros.

Nintendo of America's product analyst, Howard Phillips, disliked the game when he was assigned to test it, feeling it was far too punishing to be fun.[14] On Phillip's recommendation, Nintendo of America president Minoru Arakawa would pass on releasing the Japanese Super Mario Bros. 2, and instead commissioned the Japanese headquarters to retool the loosely related platforming game Yume Kōjō: Doki Doki Panic into a Super Mario Bros. sequel to continue promoting the successful Super Mario franchise.[15]

After The Lost Levels was refused for a release in the Western world, marketing head Gail Tilden proposed a program where a NES version of the game would be given as a bonus for Nintendo Power subscribers. Though a NES cartridge of The Lost Levels was produced, the plan was abandoned due to concerns over brand confusion.[16]

Pre-release and unused content[edit]

SMBLL Unused Tiles.png
An early build of Super Mario Bros. 2: The Lost Levels seen in a Japanese commercial for the game.
A frame from the commercial
  • Some unused ground textures, along with a cactus for a background decoration, can be found in the SM2CHAR1 graphics file.[17]
  • As with the previous game, RAM address 03F0 keeps track of the number of blocks hit, though no routine ever reads the value stored here.[17]
  • A Japanese commercial for the game features what appears to be an earlier version of the game, showing yet another unused ground texture and an alternate Poison Mushroom sprite with a symmetrical spot placement.

Re-releases[edit]

An emulation of Super Mario Bros.: The Lost Levels was released in Japan for the Game Boy Advance as part of the Famicom Mini series on August 10, 2004.

It was released on the Virtual Console in Japan on May 1, 2007 for the Wii, on July 25, 2012 for the Nintendo 3DS and the Wii U in Japan on August 8, 2013. It was also released for the Wii in Europe and Australia on September 14, 2007 along with Mario's Super Picross and Neutopia II as the part of the Japanese Hanabi Festival, and in North America on October 1, 2007, making the first time the original version of the game was available to most international audiences. It costs 100 Wii Points more, as usual for imported games. Unlike other games, however, it was removed from the European/Australian Wii Shop Channel on October 1, 2007, before being re-added permanently on August 22, 2008. It became available for the Nintendo 3DS outside Japan on December 27, 2012. It was released for the Wii U in Europe and Australia on January 23, 2014 and in North America on March 13, 2014.

The Wii release requires 23 blocks (2.9 MB) to be installed, while the Wii U release requires 15 MB to be installed.

It was released on the Nintendo Entertainment System - Nintendo Switch Online application for the Nintendo Switch in April 2019.

It is included in Game & Watch: Super Mario Bros., which was released on November 13, 2020.

Remakes[edit]

Super Mario All-Stars[edit]

World C-1
Snowy World C-1 in Super Mario All-Stars.

The Super Mario All-Stars (as well as Super Mario All-Stars + Super Mario World and Super Mario All-Stars Limited Edition) version of this game had a few differences from the original:

  • Super Mario Bros. and Super Mario Bros.: The Lost Levels do not have the same graphics as each other to begin with. For instance, the ground is covered by blocks in most of the levels of the original, whereas the ground is mainly covered by dirt in this version. In Super Mario All-Stars, the graphics of all the games were improved, and Super Mario Bros.: The Lost Levels was made to look exactly the same as the graphically-improved version of Super Mario Bros. released on the same cartridge. The endings of both games were also made uniform.
  • Many levels that had snow in the original Japanese Super Mario Bros. 2 do not have it in the Super Mario Bros.: The Lost Levels edition: 3-3, 7-1, 7-2, 7-3, 8-1, C-3, D-1, D-2, and D-3. Likewise, one level that did not have snow originally has snow in the Super Mario All-Stars remake: C-1. However, the snow is only an aesthetic difference.
  • If the player decides to continue after a Game Over, they will start over at the beginning of the current level, rather than the current world as in the original version.
  • The game can be saved at any time. Unlike in Super Mario Bros. on the same cartridge, the game remembers the exact level the player is on, and not just the world. This is because the game is much harder than the original.
  • In the secret section of World 1-2 (where the player enters the pipe to World 4), the water pools were replaced by lava. However, the effects are the same: if Mario falls in, he loses one life. Similarly, the water in the first pit encountered in the level (after the Koopa Paratroopa) is removed in the SNES version.
  • The player would get a positive or negative audio cue to indicate if they were going the right or wrong way in the mazes of World 3-4, 6-4, and 8-4, making navigation slightly easier in those levels.
  • In World 8, the Hammer Brothers perpetually charge at the player. On the SNES, this behavior was added to Worlds 7, 9, and A through D as well.
  • The castle walls of World 9-3 (whose background is sky blue instead of black) are now recolored brown instead of gray like in the original (and in the ending cutscene).
  • Players only have to beat the game once to reach Worlds A through D.
  • In the original game, Bowsers use hammers in only Worlds 6-9. The SNES remake gives them hammers in Worlds A-D, as well. Strangely enough, these Bowsers lose their Fire Breath.
  • Super Springs in World B have been replaced with regular Springs.
  • The fake Bowsers in Worlds A-C now have new true forms (a red Koopa Troopa, a Cheep Cheep, and a Bullet Bill, respectively), and the fake Bowser's death animation in World D is changed to make him into a real Bowser.

Super Mario Bros. Deluxe[edit]

Super Mario Bros. Deluxe was marketed as a Game Boy Color enhancement of Super Mario Bros., but if a player gets on the high score table with 300,000 points or more, a Luigi head appears on the main menu. Players may select the Luigi head to play Super Mario Bros.: The Lost Levels under the name of Super Mario Bros. for Super Players.

In this game, as in the Super Mario All-Stars version, the player may save and resume at any level. However, most changes removed features from the original release. This remake removes the graphical changes from Super Mario Bros.: The Lost Levels and thus looks just like Super Mario Bros. Additionally, Luigi's higher jump and lower traction are removed, as is wind. As a result of the lack of wind, some levels are modified to make the jumps possible. Another change is the removal of Worlds 9 and A-D, although they are all at least somewhat present within the game's coding.

Descriptions[edit]

Wii Shop Channel

"Originally released in Japan as Super Mario Bros.® 2, this game has previously made only brief cameo appearances in the Western hemisphere. Now available on the Virtual Console in all of its original splendor, Mario fans will appreciate the familiar look and feel of the game, while finding that its updated game play creates an entirely new challenge. No longer content just to wear different-colored overalls, Mario and Luigi also possess different skill sets (Mario can stop quicker, while Luigi can jump higher). In addition to the classic enemies already known to fans worldwide, there are also Poison Mushrooms, backward Warp Zones, and the occasional wind gust (which can help or hinder your progress) to take into account. And if that's somehow not enough, expert players can go looking for the game's secret worlds. So get ready to put your Mario skills to the ultimate test, and save the Princess again. Just don't be surprised if she's in another castle!"

Nintendo eShop

"This game was originally released in Japan as Super Mario Bros. 2. Mario fans will appreciate the familiar look and feel of the game while finding that its updated gameplay creates an entirely new challenge as compared to the first Super Mario Bros. In addition to the classic enemies already known to fans worldwide, there are also Poison Mushrooms, backward Warp Zones, and the occasional wind gust (which can help or hinder your progress). Players can also choose to control Luigi as the main protagonist. If that's somehow not enough, expert players can go looking for the game's secret worlds. So get ready to put your Super Mario skills to the ultimate test and save the princess again. Just don't be surprised if she's in another castle!"

Reception[edit]

The Japanese Super Mario Bros. 2 served as one of the flagship titles for newly released Famicom Disk System in 1986, alongside The Legend of Zelda. Super Mario Bros. 2 was intended to be a game for expert gamers that had mastered the original Super Mario Bros. and were looking for a new challenge. It was the most popular Famicom Disk System game, selling about 2.5 million copies. Japanese critics at the time, however, characterized the game as an "expansion pack" or "update" to the original rather than an actual sequel.[citation needed]

Reviews
Release Reviewer, Publication Score Comment
Wii Marcel van Duyn, Nintendo Life 8/10 "But is it worth shelling out the money again for what is essentially version 2 of Super Mario Bros.? If you're a fan, yes. The completely different levels, slightly changed visuals and Luigi mode make the game feel like a little more than "just an update". If you're not a big Mario fan, though, I would suggest sticking with the original (Unless you like extremely hard games). Another thing to take into consideration is that this game, in it's original NES/Famicom form, was never released in Europe and America. The All-Stars version had upgraded graphics and sound (And slightly lowered the difficulty), while the DX version cut out Worlds 9 and A-D. This means this is the first time you can own this game in it's original, complete form (Unless you live in Japan or imported a Famicom Disk System and the game!)."
Wii U Robert Hughes, Nintendo Life 8/10 "Those who hated The Lost Levels on its inclusion in Super Mario All-Stars, due either to its difficulty or lack of originality, may find that they have a new-found appreciation for this underrated gem. It's not without flaws, but when played in tandem with the Wii U's save state functionality in short doses to alleviate frustration, there's a lot to enjoy here. Some of the level design and intentional placement of obstacles and enemies is almost frighteningly devious, a sense of playful teasing that is perhaps sorely lacking from present-day Nintendo's 'games for everybody' line-up. Super Mario Bros.: The Lost Levels will constantly taunt the player with its level of challenge and meticulously sinister design, but those who enjoy triumph through adversity and can handle a little frustration will enjoy every second of it."
Wii Lucas M.Thomas, IGN 8.5/10 "A fairly popular trend on the Internet now is hacking old Mario games to make new levels, then challenging friends to try to beat the purposefully too-difficult designs. You can find videos of the subculture scattered on YouTube and similar sites, and watch as players try over and over to get through seemingly impossible side-scrolling challenges. Super Mario Bros.: The Lost Levels is a lot like that."
Wii Frank Provo, GameSpot 6.5/10 "At 600 Wii points, the original, unedited rendition of Super Mario Bros. 2 is a decent buy, provided that you're the sort of masochist who wants to play Super Mario Bros. with the difficulty cranked to the breaking point."

References in later games[edit]

Staff[edit]

Like the original Super Mario Bros., Super Mario Bros.: The Lost Levels does not feature a staff roll or any sort of credits. Unlike its predecessor, however, very little has been written about the game's development, leaving its precise staff composition a mystery. In a promotional interview for the NES Classic Edition, the game is referred to as Takashi Tezuka's directorial debut.[18]

Media[edit]

Video.svg Super Mario Bros.: The Lost Levels - World 1-1 speedrun.
File infoMedia:SMBTLL W1-1.ogv
0:38
Audio.svg Super Mario Bros.: The Lost Levels - Ending theme
File infoMedia:SMBTLL Ending Theme.oga
0:30
Help:MediaHaving trouble playing?

Glitches[edit]

A glitch from Super Mario Bros.: The Lost Levels.
Mario, performing the Infinite 1-Up Trick.
Main article: List of Super Mario Bros.: The Lost Levels glitches

Super Mario Bros.: The Lost Levels contains several glitches; the most famous glitch is the Infinite 1-Up Trick, which can be performed several ways using a Koopa Shell. Another glitch can be performed by touching the Axe while the timer is at zero, looping it to 999.

Gallery[edit]

For this subject's image gallery, see Gallery:Super Mario Bros.: The Lost Levels.

Quotes[edit]

  • "Peace is paved / with kingdom saved / Hurrah to Mario/Luigi / our only hero / This ends your trip / of a long friendship." - Poem recited by Princess Peach after defeating Bowser, after which the player is rewarded with 100,000 points for each life left (also seen in VS. Super Mario Bros. and All Night Nippon: Super Mario Bros.)
  • "Thank you Mario/Luigi!" - Princess Peach and Toads, following the above
  • "We present Fantasy World / Let's try "9 World" with one game." -- World 9 intro screen
  • 「アリガトウ!」 (Arigatō!, meaning "Thank you!" when translated from Japanese) -- Coral in World 9-4
  • "You're a super player! We hope we'll see you again. Mario and staff." -- Game Over screen for World 9

Names in other languages[edit]

Language Name Meaning
Japanese スーパーマリオブラザーズ2
Sūpā Mario Burazāzu Tsū
Super Mario Bros. 2

Chinese (simplified) 超级马力欧兄弟2[19]
Chāojí Mǎlì'ōu Xiōngdì 2
Super Mario Bros. 2

Chinese (traditional) 超級瑪利歐兄弟2[20]
Chāojí Mǎlì'ōu Xiōngdì 2
Super Mario Bros. 2

Italian Super Mario Bros.: I Livelli Perduti (Super Mario All-Stars only)[21]
Super Mario Bros.: The Lost Levels
Korean 슈퍼 마리오 브라더스 더 로스트 레벨즈
Syupeo Mario Beuradeoseu Deo Roseuteu Rebeljeu
슈퍼 마리오브라더스 2[22]
Syupeo Mario Beuradeoseu 2
Super Mario Bros. The Lost Levels

Super Mario Bros. 2

Trivia[edit]

  • Dummied data for the game Dōbutsu no Mori+ indicated that Super Mario Bros.: The Lost Levels (or, more accurately, Super Mario Bros. 2) as well as Mario Open Golf would have been included as a playable Famicom game, but it ultimately was cut with not even a ROM or models available inside.[23]
  • At the end of the Mario Kart 8 April 30 Nintendo Direct, when the Nintendo fan pulls out his "Things to do before I die" list to write "Buy Mario Kart 8", one of the other notes on the list is "Beat SMB2: The Lost Levels",[24] a reference to how difficult the game is compared to other Super Mario games.
  • The worlds that take place at night (2 and 7) and the worlds with an underwater level (3 and 6) are the inverse of the worlds' placements in the original Super Mario Bros.
  • In the Family Computer Disk System version only, the disk drive is automatically activated at the end of Worlds 4 and 8. Additionally, after World 5 starts, if the player resets the game, the disk drive is activated and the game returns to the title screen.[25]
  • The game uses a "brother byte" to determine the current brother's name and appearance. There are two valid brothers, Mario and Luigi, and 254 invalid ones. Out of them, only three have names that are not glitched: Iolui, Uigiy, and Ariol.[26]

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Promotional flyer with final street date.
  2. ^ a b Super Mario Bros. 2 Disk System instruction booklet. Page 2. Archived March 15, 2016, 14:42:48 UTC from the original via Wayback Machine.
  3. ^ Nintendo (April 2, 2019)). ファミリーコンピュータ Nintendo Switch Online 追加タイトル [2019年4月]. YouTube (Japanese). Retrieved May 31, 2024.
  4. ^ Nintendo of America (April 2, 2019). Nintendo Entertainment System - April Game Updates - Nintendo Switch Online. YouTube. Retrieved May 31, 2024.
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