Pigarithm

From the Super Mario Wiki, the Mario encyclopedia
Jump to navigationJump to search
Pigarithm
Sprite of a Pigarithm from Super Paper Mario.
Sprite from Super Paper Mario
First appearance Super Paper Mario (2007)
Variants

The Pigarithm is an enemy in Super Paper Mario. Its name is a play on "pig" and "logarithm". The Pigarithm is made up of three green piggy banks connected to one another. Each time it is attacked, one of the piggy banks is removed, making it smaller and faster. When the last one is destroyed, the player earns a large amount of coins. They appear in the Whoa Zone and the Flipside Pit of 100 Trials.

Profiles and statistics[edit]

Super Paper Mario[edit]

Super Paper Mario enemy
Pigarithm
Sprite of a Pigarithm from Super Paper Mario. Max HP ?? (3 hits) Role Common Location(s) Whoa Zone (4-4), Flipside Pit of 100 Trials (Room 52)
Attack 2 Card type Common
Defense 0 Items Shell Shock, Volt Shroom Card location(s) Card Shop; Catch Card/SP
Score 400
Card description Takes three stomps to beat. Stomp the piggy bank to get the golden goodness inside! Each time you stomp, the pig will get a little smaller.
  List of Catch Cards  
  143      144      145  
Tattle This bizarre beast is called a Pigarithm. Everything about it is just...odd... Max HP is ??. Attack is 2. It takes three stomps to finish off this piggy... But each stomp makes it smaller and faster... It's very hard to stomp the last one... Pigarithms often drop many coins, so you may want to hunt them if you're broke...

Gallery[edit]

Names in other languages[edit]

Language Name Meaning
Japanese ブーチョ
Būcho
From「ブーブー」(būbū, an onomatopoeia meaning "oink") and possibly「貯金箱」(chokinbako, piggy bank); shared with one of the Three Little Pigheads

French Logachon
Portmanteau of "logarithme" (logarithm) and "cochon" (pig)
German Quiektainer
Portmanteau of "quieken" (to squeal) and "container"
Italian Maiaritmo
Portmanteau of "maiale" (pig) and "logaritmo" (logarithm)
Korean 돼통
Dwaetong
From "돼지" (dwaeji, swine) and "" (tong, "container" in Sino-Korean)

Spanish Porcal
From "porcus" ("piglet" in Latin) and "fractal"