Color Block

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This article is about the recurring objects in the Mario vs. Donkey Kong series. For the placeable blocks in Mario vs. Donkey Kong 2: March of the Minis, see Color Block (Mario vs. Donkey Kong 2: March of the Minis).

Color Blocks[1] are blocks that appear in several games in the Mario vs. Donkey Kong series. They come in red, yellow, and blue varieties, and can be manipulated by Color Switches.

History[edit]

Mario vs. Donkey Kong[edit]

Color Blocks in Level 1-1

Color Blocks first appear in Mario vs. Donkey Kong, being introduced in the first level in the game, Level 1-1. In this game, all Color Blocks of a certain color are either inactive or active at a given time. When Mario presses a Color Switch, Color Blocks of the same color as the Color Switch become active and tangible, while Color Blocks of different colors become inactive and intangible.

Mario vs. Donkey Kong: Minis March Again![edit]

Color blocks in Room 4-3

Color Blocks reappear in Mario vs. Donkey Kong: Minis March Again!, where they are parsed as color blocks[2] and are introduced in Room 4-3 of Jungle Rumble. In this game, inactive color blocks are clear, while active color blocks are solid.[2] When a Mini presses a Color Switch, color blocks of the same color as the Color Switch invert their current state. Solid color blocks are tangible blocks that can be walked on by Minis. Clear color blocks are intangible, slightly transparent, and spin when a Mini passes through them. Color blocks have a red, yellow, or blue outline and a rivet in their center. Unlike in Mario vs. Donkey Kong, both clear and solid color blocks of the same color can appear at the same time.

Mario vs. Donkey Kong: Tipping Stars[edit]

Color Blocks in Level 2-2

Color Blocks reappear in Mario vs. Donkey Kong: Tipping Stars, being introduced in Level 2-2 of Jumpy Jungle. They function identically to color blocks from Mario vs. Donkey Kong: Minis March Again!. Inactive Color Blocks are referred to as being off, while active color blocks are referred to as being on.[3] In this game, Color Blocks do not have a rivet in their center, and they take the form of small, slightly transparent cubes when turned off.

Names in other languages[edit]

Language Name Meaning
Japanese カラーブロック[4]
Karā Burokku
Color Block

References[edit]

  1. ^ Mario vs. Donkey Kong Virtual Console digital instruction manual
  2. ^ a b Mario vs. Donkey Kong: Minis March Again! Floor 4 Help 1 (Color Blocks)
  3. ^ Mario vs. Donkey Kong: Tipping Stars editor object names
  4. ^ Mario vs. Donkey Kong Shogakukan book