Hurling for Distance

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Hurling for Distance
DKhurlingdistance1.jpg
The first screen of the game
Developer(s) Unknown
Publisher(s) Nintendo
Platform(s) Adobe Flash
Release date 2005[citation needed]
Genre Action
Rating(s) N/A
Mode(s) Single player
Media HTML
Input Mouse

DK: King of Swing -- Hurling for Distance is an online Flash game originally published as a tie-in with DK: King of Swing for the Game Boy Advance. It was playable on the official DK: King of Swing website, and was also listed among other web games in the Nintendo Arcade section of nintendo.com[1], which was removed in newer versions of the website. The characters in the game are simply depicted as their inanimate artworks used for DK: King of Swing, with Donkey Kong being the playable character, Cranky Kong announcing the results, and a Mini-Necky spectating.

Gameplay[edit]

The rock approaches the 600 ft marker.

Donkey Kong lies suspended from a peg, holding a rock which he has to hurl as far as possible. In order to throw the rock, the player has to click on Donkey Kong to make him swing around the peg and gain momentum, then click on him again to release the rock. The distance covered by the rock is measured in feet. To gain more distance, the rock can bounce off tires placed regularly at the bottom of the stage. Tires located every 50 ft are joined with markers that display the distance up to that point (0, 50, 100, 150 ft etc.)

Once the rock falls on the ground, Cranky Kong appears on the screen to message the results, commenting on the performance as either "weak" (if the rock is thrown at less than 25 ft) or "way to hurl". At the same time, the player can choose to hurl again or visit the official website of DK: King of Swing. The game does not impose a target distance, but records the "best hurl" achieved by the player, as well as the distance traversed in the last played session.

Gallery[edit]

Reference[edit]

  1. ^ Nintendo Arcade, archived via Wayback Machine