List of stages debuting in Super Smash Bros.

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This is a list of Super Smash Bros. series stages that debuted in the original Super Smash Bros. game. The page details their role in this series.

See also:

Peach's Castle[edit]

Peach's Castle (Super Smash Bros. stage) in Super Smash Bros. Ultimate.
The Peach's Castle stage in Super Smash Bros. Ultimate
Main article: Peach's Castle (Super Smash Bros.)

In the original Super Smash Bros. game and Super Smash Bros. Ultimate, Peach's Castle is available from the start. In Super Smash Bros. for Nintendo 3DS and Super Smash Bros. for Wii U, it was available as a downloadable stage between July 31, 2015 and the discontinuation of the Nintendo eShop service for the Nintendo 3DS and Wii U on March 27, 2023.

Kongo Jungle[edit]

Kongo Jungle stage in Super Smash Bros. Ultimate.
The Kongo Jungle stage in Super Smash Bros. Ultimate
Main article: Kongo Jungle (Super Smash Bros.)

In the original Super Smash Bros. game and Super Smash Bros. Ultimate, Kongo Jungle is available from the start. In Super Smash Bros. Melee and Super Smash Bros. for Wii U, it is available as an unlockable stage.

Hyrule Castle[edit]

Hyrule Castle in Super Smash Bros. Ultimate.
The Hyrule Castle stage in Super Smash Bros. Ultimate
Main article: Hyrule Castle § Super Smash Bros. series

In the original Super Smash Bros. game and Super Smash Bros. Ultimate, Hyrule Castle is available from the start. In Super Smash Bros. for Nintendo 3DS and Super Smash Bros. for Wii U, it was available as a downloadable stage between July 31, 2015 and the discontinuation of the Nintendo eShop service for the Nintendo 3DS and Wii U on March 27, 2023.

Planet Zebes[edit]

Planet Zebes
Planet Zebes's appearance in Super Smash Bros.

Planet Zebes is a stage that only appears in Super Smash Bros. It is a planet seen in the Metroid series and the main setting of the first and the third game in the series, Metroid and Super Metroid, respectively. The surface is mostly barren and the underground is riddled with large caverns.

The only feature is the acid, that rises about every 30 seconds and damages any players. After a few cycles, it rises so high that only the center platform, which is also the highest, is safe. Samus is always fought here in 1P Mode. The unlocking match for Captain Falcon takes place here, due to the game featuring no F-Zero stages.

The stage itself is not in any of the successors. A similar stage called Brinstar is in the games instead. The stage's music actually returns in Super Smash Bros. Ultimate, however, and can be played on any Metroid-themed stage. Alongside Sector Z, it is one of only two stages from the original Super Smash Bros. game that do not reappear in Super Smash Bros. Ultimate, not counting the Meta Crystal.

Names in other languages[edit]

Language Name Meaning
Japanese 惑星ゼーベス
Wakusei Zēbesu
Planet Zebes

Super Happy Tree[edit]

Super Happy Tree (Super Smash Bros. 64 stage) in Super Smash Bros. Ultimate.
The Super Happy Tree stage in Super Smash Bros. Ultimate
Main article: Super Happy Tree (stage)

In the original Super Smash Bros. game and Super Smash Bros. Ultimate, Super Happy Tree is available from the start. In Super Smash Bros. Melee, it is available as an unlockable stage.

Dream Land[edit]

This section is about the stage originating from Super Smash Bros. For the stage in Super Smash Bros. for Nintendo 3DS, see List of stages debuting in Super Smash Bros. for Nintendo 3DS § Dream Land GB.
Dream Land
The Dream Land stage, as it appears in Super Smash Bros.
Dream Land in Super Smash Bros. Ultimate.
Dream Land in Super Smash Bros. Ultimate.

Dream Land is a central location in the Kirby series, being Kirby, Meta Knight, and King Dedede's home land. It is also a stage in the game Super Smash Bros. However, it is set in the forest of Dream Land, rather than the village. The stage layout consists of three platforms arranged with two on both sides and one higher platform in the middle. The main feature of the stage is Whispy Woods, who occasionally blows a heavy wind at players which pushes them toward either side of the stage. At certain points, a Bronto Burt or King Dedede can be seen flying by in the background. The "Challenger Approaching!" match to unlock Ness takes place here, due to the game featuring no EarthBound stages.

In Super Smash Bros. Melee, Dream Land reappears as one of the Past Stages.

Dream Land returns in its original form as a DLC stage in Super Smash Bros. for Wii U and Super Smash Bros. for Nintendo 3DS, released June 14, 2015 under the name Dream Land (64). Besides being touched up to higher graphical quality, it was designed to be identical to the original version of the stage. Dream Land also has an Omega version with no platforms, like every other stage, and while Whispy Woods still appears in the background, he does not do anything. While the Bronto Burts and King Dedede still make their background appearances, King Dedede does not appear in this capacity if he is a part of the match.

Dream Land reappears in Super Smash Bros. Ultimate.

Songs[edit]

Super Smash Bros. for Nintendo 3DS[edit]

Name Source Credits
Dream Land Super Smash Bros.
(Kirby Super Star)
Arrangement Supervisor: Hirokazu Ando
Composition: HAL Laboratory, Inc.
Arrangement: HAL Laboratory, Inc.
Ice Cream Island Kirby's Adventure Arrangement Supervisor: Yoshihito Yano
Composition: HAL Laboratory, Inc.
Arrangement: BANDAI NAMCO Studios Inc.

Super Smash Bros. for Wii U[edit]

Name Source Credits
Dream Land Super Smash Bros.
(Kirby Super Star)
Arrangement Supervisor: Hirokazu Ando
Composition: HAL Laboratory, Inc.
Arrangement: HAL Laboratory, Inc.
Ice Cream Island Kirby's Adventure Arrangement Supervisor: Yoshihito Yano
Composition: HAL Laboratory, Inc.
Arrangement: BANDAI NAMCO Studios Inc.
The Fountain of Dreams Super Smash Bros. Melee
(Kirby Super Star)
Arrangement Supervisor: Tadashi Ikegami
Composition: HAL Laboratory, Inc.
Arrangement: HAL Laboratory, Inc.
Planet Popstar Kirby 64: The Crystal Shards Original
Forest Stage Kirby Air Ride Original
The World to Win Kirby: Triple Deluxe Original

Gallery[edit]

Super Smash Bros. for Nintendo 3DS[edit]

Names in other languages[edit]

Language Name Meaning
Japanese プププランド
Pupupu Rando
Pupupu Land
Chinese (Simplified) 梦幻国 (SSB)
Mènghuànguó
噗噗噗之国
Pūpūpū zhī guó
Dream Land

Pupupu Country
Chinese (Traditional) 噗噗噗之國
Pūpūpū zhī guó
Pupupu Country
Dutch Dromenland (3DS / Wii U)
Dream Land (SSBU)
Dreamland
-
French Pays de Rêves (SSB)
Dream Land
Land of Dreams
-
German Dream Land -
Italian Dream Land -
Korean 푸푸푸랜드
Pupupu Raendeu
Pupupu Land
Portuguese Terra dos Sonhos Land of Dreams
Russian Страна мечты (3DS / Wii U)
Strana mechty
Страна грез (SSBU)
Strana grez
Dream Country

Country of Dreams
Spanish Dream Land -

Sector Z[edit]

Sector Z
Sector Z

Sector Z is a stage that only appears in Super Smash Bros. for the Nintendo 64. It is the second largest stage, with the Mushroom Kingdom stage being the largest. This arena takes place on the Great Fox, which is Fox McCloud's ship, in an area of the Lylat system called Sector Z. Occasionally, an Arwing will appear and shoot at the players. It will either shoot a very strong blast across the screen or directly at one of the fighters. The stage did not return in any of the sequels. Instead, they featured two other stages that involve a fight on the Great Fox: Corneria and Venom. However, the stage's music actually returns in Super Smash Bros. Ultimate, and can be played on any Star Fox-themed stage. Alongside Planet Zebes, it is one of only two stages from the original Super Smash Bros. game that do not reappear in Super Smash Bros. Ultimate, not counting the Meta Crystal.

Names in other languages[edit]

Language Name Meaning
Japanese セクターZ
Sekutā Z
Sector Z (alternatively "Sector Z Abord[sic] a Great Fox" in the original Super Smash Bros.)

Saffron City[edit]

Saffron City from Super Smash Bros..
The Saffron City stage in Super Smash Bros.
Saffron City in Super Smash Bros. Ultimate.
Saffron City in Super Smash Bros. Ultimate

Saffron City is a stage in Super Smash Bros. and returns in Super Smash Bros. Ultimate. The stage is set upon the Silph Co. building and is the home stage of Pikachu and Jigglypuff (with the unlock match for the latter taking place here). The city seems to be modeled after the Pokémon anime, as the games' cities and towns are not as detailed (this includes major cities such as Celadon or Goldenrod). The stage has the most features of any stage in the game. On the right side of the arena, there are floating platforms. On the left side of the arena, there is a door leading down the stairs, but when one tries to go down, a random Pokémon will jump out and attack the player. Here are all of the Pokémon that appear in the building:

Name Attack Description
Pokémon
Venusaur Razor Leaf Venusaur uses Razor Leaf to hit every character in front of it.
Pokémon
Charmander Flamethrower Charmander breathes fire at other players.
Pokémon
Electrode Explosion Electrode flashes for a while and then uses Explosion to instantly knockout anyone in its blast radius.
Pokémon
Chansey Softboiled Chansey uses Softboiled to dispense eggs; they are identical to capsules.
Pokémon
Porygon Tackle Porygon suddenly charges out of the building and causes high damage to players hit by it.

The Silph Co. logo is spelled as "Silf" in the Japanese version. Also, the banner on the left side is slightly altered between both versions. The Japanese banner has an example of Engrish in which it reads "Got a catch 'em all!".

Saffron City is the only stage in Super Smash Bros. that neither returned nor had a similar stage in Super Smash Bros. Melee.

Names in other languages[edit]

Language Name Meaning
Japanese ヤマブキシティ
Yamabuki Shiti
Yamabuki City. "Yamabuki" (山吹) is the Japanese name of a eastern golden-yellow color flower called Kerria japonica.
Chinese 金黄市 (Traditional)
金黃市 (Simplified)
Jīnhuáng Shì (Mandarin)
Gamwong Si
(Cantonese)
Golden Yellow City
Dutch Saffron City Same as English
French Safrania "Safran-" means "saffron" in French.
German Saffronia City From Safran, saffron
Italian Zafferanopoli Saffron City
Korean 노랑 시티
Norang Siti
Yellow City
Russian Шафран-Сити
Shafran-Siti
Saffron-City
Spanish (NOA) Ciudad Saffron The Latin American name in the anime.
Spanish (NOE) Ciudad Azafrán From azafrán, saffron

Mushroom Kingdom[edit]

Mushroom Kingdom in Super Smash Bros. Ultimate.
The Mushroom Kingdom stage in Super Smash Bros. Ultimate
Main article: Mushroom Kingdom (Super Smash Bros.)

In the original Super Smash Bros. game, Mushroom Kingdom is available as an unlockable stage. In Super Smash Bros. Ultimate, it is available from the start.

Meta Crystal[edit]

Meta Crystal

Meta Crystal is a stage that only appears in the game Super Smash Bros. It consists of one small platform hovering above a larger one. It is not unlockable, and it is only used for one battle against Metal Mario in 1-Player mode. Even though the stage is small, it's hard to knock Metal Mario off of the stage because of his weight. The background is made up of metallic crystals and a red wire fence. These objects can be found in the Hazy Maze Cave and the Cavern of the Metal Cap in the game Super Mario 64. This stage is the only one in the entire series not to be remade in another form or replaced in the sequels. All others are either updated (i.e. Battlefield and Final Destination) or replaced with similar counterparts (series-based stages), as the purpose of fighting metal characters is taken by Battlefield in Melee and then by any random stage in Brawl.

Names in other languages[edit]

Language Name Meaning
Japanese メタ・クリスタル[1]
Meta Kurisutaru
Meta Crystal

Battlefield[edit]

Battlefield in Super Smash Bros. Ultimate
Battlefield as seen in Super Smash Bros. Ultimate
Big Battlefield, in Super Smash Bros. for Wii U.
Big Battlefield in Super Smash Bros. for Wii U

Battlefield is a recurring stage within the Super Smash Bros. series, appearing in every installment to date. The stage has been designed specially for the Super Smash Bros. series and does not originate from any other Nintendo franchise. Battlefield is a floating stage consisting of a large floor platform and three smaller pass-through platforms hovering above it. The stage does not have any hazards, like Final Destination, which allows players to solely concentrate on the fight. The design has changed in each installment, with early appearances having it in a dark void and later ones in scenic floating ruins.

In Super Smash Bros., Battlefield is the stage where the Fighting Polygons are battled. However, much like Final Destination, the stage cannot be played in VS Mode. Its theme seems to be an arrangement of the music for Mario's castle in Super Mario Land 2: 6 Golden Coins.

Super Smash Bros. Melee is the first game to feature Battlefield as a selectable stage. It can be unlocked by completing All-Star mode on any difficulty. In addition, the Fighting Wire Frames as well as the metal enemies are battled on it.

In Super Smash Bros. Brawl, Battlefield returns as a default stage. The stage now takes a natural green landscape as opposed to the abstract background in the previous games. It also features a day and night system that changes the time of day as the battle goes on. The stage is once again the location where the Fighting Alloy Team is battled.

Battlefield in its Ω form appearance in Super Smash Bros. Ultimate.
The Ω form of Battlefield and Big Battlefield

The Super Smash Bros. for Nintendo 3DS / Wii U variations of this stage take a lot from the design of the Super Smash Bros. Brawl version, as it is in a natural green landscape and features a day and night system that changes as the battle goes on, but the background has been improved slightly. The 3DS version's background consists of several jagged, slanted mountains jutting out from the clouds, while the Wii U version features several floating islands of old, broken architecture covered in small plant life, with a visible moon the center. Additionally, the Wii U version has a larger variant named Big Battlefield designed for 8-player matches, though it can still be used by less players. The platforms are arranged similarly to a pyramid and there are three additional platforms. The Ω form of Battlefield removes the pass-through platforms, although the day and night cycle still occurs. This stage shares its Ω form with Big Battlefield.

Small Battlefield in Super Smash Bros. Ultimate
Small Battlefield

The Super Smash Bros. Ultimate variation bears a close resemblance to its predecessor, with similarly styled platforms and main arena. Instead of ruined structures, buildings still intact as well as many waterfalls can be seen in the background. Big Battlefield returns as well. Additionally, every stage in the game includes a Battlefield form, which changes the layout of each stage to resemble Battlefield. In the version 8.1 update released on August 4, 2020, Small Battlefield was added, which features only two platforms, making its layout similar to that of Pokémon Stadium and it is suitable for one-on-one matches. The update also added the ability to play any song in the game on all three variations of Battlefield as well as on Final Destination.[2]

In Super Smash Bros. Melee, the unlock match for Falco takes place here. In Super Smash Bros. for Nintendo 3DS, the unlock match for Duck Hunt takes place here. In Super Smash Bros. Ultimate, the unlock match for Ryu takes place here.

Songs[edit]

Super Smash Bros. Brawl[edit]

My Music[edit]
Name Source Credits Requirements
Battlefield Super Smash Bros. Brawl
Menu
(Super Smash Bros. Melee)
Super Smash Bros. Melee Arrangement: Motoi Sakuraba
Battlefield Ver. 2 Super Smash Bros. Brawl
Battlefield (Melee) Super Smash Bros. Melee Original
Multi-Man Melee 1 (Melee) Super Smash Bros. Melee Original Clear 100-Man Brawl in under 4 minutes.
Not in My Music[edit]
Name Source Credits Plays In
Credits (Super Smash Bros.) Super Smash Bros. Arrangement Supervisor: Yusuke Takahama 10-Man Brawl
Cruel Brawl Super Smash Bros. Brawl Cruel Brawl
Menu 1 Super Smash Bros. Brawl Co-op Event No. 21 ("The True All-Star Battle")

Super Smash Bros. for Nintendo 3DS[edit]

Name Source Credits
Battlefield Original Composition Supervisor: Keiki Kobayashi
Composition: BANDAI NAMCO Studios Inc.
Arrangement: BANDAI NAMCO Studios Inc.
Menu (Melee) Super Smash Bros. Melee Arrangement: Motoi Sakuraba
Composition: HAL Laboratory, Inc.

Super Smash Bros. for Wii U[edit]

Name Source Credits Requirements
Battlefield Original Composition Supervisor: Keiki Kobayashi
Composition: BANDAI NAMCO Studios Inc.
Arrangement: BANDAI NAMCO Studios Inc.
Available by default
Multi-Man Smash Original Arrangement Supervisor: Yoshihito Yano
Composition: BANDAI NAMCO Studios Inc.
Arrangement: BANDAI NAMCO Studios Inc.
Available by default
Trophy Rush Original Arrangement Supervisor: Katsuro Tajima
Composition: BANDAI NAMCO Studios Inc.
Arrangement: BANDAI NAMCO Studios Inc.
Available by default
Credits (Super Smash Bros.): Ver. 2 Super Smash Bros. Arrangement Supervisor: Ryo Nagamatsu
Composition: HAL Laboratory, Inc.
Arrangement: Nintendo
Collect CD
Menu (Melee) Super Smash Bros. Melee Arrangement: Motoi Sakuraba
Composition: HAL Laboratory, Inc.
Available by default
Boss Battle (Melee) Super Smash Bros. Melee Arrangement Supervisor: Shogo Sakai
Composition: HAL Laboratory, Inc.
Arrangement: HAL Laboratory, Inc.
Available by default
Multi-Man Melee 2 Super Smash Bros. Melee Original Clear Solo 100-Man Smash within 3 minutes while playing as Mii Swordfighter
Cruel Smash (Brawl) Super Smash Bros. Brawl Original Collect CD
Battlefield (Brawl) Super Smash Bros. Brawl Original Available by default
Battlefield Ver. 2 (Brawl) Super Smash Bros. Brawl Original Collect CD
Boss Battle Song 1 (Brawl) Super Smash Bros. Brawl Original Available by default
Menu Original Arrangement Supervisor: Junichi Nakatsuru
Composition: BANDAI NAMCO Studios Inc.
Arrangement: BANDAI NAMCO Studios Inc.
Available by default

Multi-Man mode enemies[edit]

Fighting Polygons[edit]

Link fighting a Fighting Polygon version of Jigglypuff
SmashWiki article: Fighting Polygon Team

The Fighting Polygons (also called the Fighting Polygon Team) are a group of weak enemies found in Super Smash Bros. They possess very little attack and defense prowess, but their numbers can pose a threat (the player fights 30 of them in the penultimate stage of the 1P Game).

Their bodies are all the characters' basic polygon structure (hence their name), all colored purple. Their designs appear edited from the original mode. They do not have the voices of the characters they are modeled after, making them completely silent. For example, Kirby's version appears as a cake, and Yoshi's version has three teeth. Mario, Luigi and Ness' versions look very similar to each other, only being told apart by their moving pattern (Ness's version makes the same glittering noise of the real Ness when jumping) and that the Ness one's nose is lower than Mario one's nose.

Names in other languages[edit]
Language Name Meaning
Japanese 謎のザコ敵軍団
Nazo no zakoteki gundan
Mysterious Small Fry Enemy Corps

Fighting Wire Frames[edit]

Fighting Wire Frames
The Fighting Wire Frames
SmashWiki article: Fighting Wire Frames

The Fighting Wire Frames appear in Super Smash Bros. Melee, replacing the Fighting Polygons. Wire Frames have the same attack pattern as Zelda and Captain Falcon (minus the special moves), and are constructed of purple wires with internal organs visible. Fighting Wire Frames can be fought in a Stadium Mode called Multi-Man Melee. Six different scenarios can be chosen here, 10-Man Melee, 100-Man Melee, 3-Minute Melee, 15-Minute Melee, Endless Melee, or the expert leveled Cruel Melee.

Names in other languages[edit]
Language Name Meaning
Japanese 謎のザコ敵軍団
Nazo no zakoteki gundan
Mysterious Small Fry Enemy Corps
Italian Sagoma Shape

Fighting Alloy Team[edit]

The four different types of Alloys in the Fighting Alloy Team in Super Smash Bros. Brawl
SmashWiki article: Fighting Alloy Team

The Fighting Alloy Team appears in Super Smash Bros. Brawl, replacing the Fighting Wire Frames. The four kinds of Alloys are the Red Alloy, Blue Alloy, Yellow Alloy, and Green Alloy. Each Alloy resembles a playable character's moveset:

The Fighting Alloy Team makes an appearance in Super Smash Bros. Ultimate as an Advanced-class support spirit that occupies one support slot. Fighters that use this spirit will start a battle with a Ray Gun. The spirit battle takes place on the Battlefield form of Final Destination, where the player faces four Captain Falcons, four Zeldas, four Marios and four Kirbys.

Names in other languages[edit]
Language Name Meaning
Japanese 謎のザコ敵軍団
Nazo no zakoteki gundan
Mysterious Small Fry Enemy Corps
Chinese 謎之雑兵軍團
Mí zhī zábīng jūntuán
Mysterious Small Fry Enemy Corps
German Metalloid from Metall (metal) + (An)droid (android)
Italian Zaamar ?

Fighting Mii Team[edit]

The Fighting Mii Team in Super Smash Bros. for Nintendo 3DS
The Fighting Mii Team in Super Smash Bros. for Nintendo 3DS
Main article: Mii § Super Smash Bros. series
SmashWiki article: Fighting Mii Team

The Fighting Mii Team appears in Super Smash Bros. for Nintendo 3DS / Wii U and Super Smash Bros. Ultimate, replacing the Fighting Alloy Team. Unlike the previous teams whose characters have a set appearance, the Fighting Mii Team uses Miis that are saved in the player's system; the Miis' heads are loaded onto a pre-set body and are randomly given either the Mii Brawler, Mii Swordfighter, or Mii Gunner moveset, albeit without special moves, grabs, and the abilities to pick up items and grab ledges.

Events[edit]

  • No 1: Trouble King (Melee)
  • No 36: Space Travelers (second half) (Melee)
  • No 37: Legendary Pokémon (Melee)
  • No 44: Mewtwo Strikes! (Melee)
  • No 20: All-Star Battle x 1 (Brawl)
  • Co-op No 21: The True All-Star Battle (Brawl)

Gallery[edit]

Names in other languages[edit]

Battlefield[edit]

Language Name Meaning
Japanese デュエルゾーン (Super Smash Bros.)
Dyueru Zōn
戦場
Senjō
Duel Zone

Battlefield
Chinese 戰場 (Traditional)
战场 (Simplified)
Zhànchǎng
Battlefield
Dutch Slagveld Battlefield
French Champ de bataille Battlefield
German Schlachtfeld Battlefield
Italian Le rovine The ruins
Korean 전장
Jeonjang
Battlefield
Portuguese Campo de Batalha Battlefield
Russian Поле боя
Pole boya
Battlefield
Spanish Campo de batalla Battlefield

Big Battlefield[edit]

Language Name Meaning
Japanese 大戦場
Daisenjō
Big Battlefield
Chinese 大戰場 (Traditional)
大战场 (Simplified)
Dà zhànchǎng
Big Battlefield
Dutch Groot Slagveld Big Battlefield
German Großes Schlachtfeld Big Battlefield
Italian Le rovine XL The XL ruins
Korean 대전장
Dae Jeonjang
Big Battlefield
Portuguese Campo de Batalha XL Battlefield XL
Russian Большое поле боя
Bol'shoye pole boya
Big Battlefield
Spanish Gran campo de batalla Big Battlefield

Small Battlefield[edit]

Language Name Meaning
Japanese 小戦場
Kosenjō
Small Battlefield
Chinese 小戰場 (Traditional)
小战场 (Simplified)
Xiǎo zhànchǎng
Small Battlefield
Dutch Klein Slagveld Small Battlefield
French Petit Champ de Bataille Small Battlefield
German Kleines Schlachtfeld Small Battlefield
Italian Le rovine XS The Ruins XS
Korean 소전장
So Jeonjang
Small Battlefield
Russian Маленькое поле боя
Malen'koye pole boya
Small Battlefield
Spanish Pequeño campo de batalla Small Battlefield

Final Destination[edit]

Final Destination in Super Smash Bros. Ultimate
Final Destination in Super Smash Bros. Ultimate

Final Destination is a stage that appears in every Super Smash Bros. game to date. It consists only of a large, featureless platform with no movement, hazards, or other disruptive elements. Final Destination floats around space, showing various backgrounds. The places that the platform travels through and the appearance of the platform itself differ between games.

In Super Smash Bros., Final Destination only appears as the battlefield on which the player fights Master Hand in Classic mode.

Final Destination reappears in Super Smash Bros. Melee as an unlockable stage, unlocked by clearing the Event Match "The Showdown", and is still where the battle against Master Hand is held in Classic mode. The player may also battle Crazy Hand, if the right conditions are met. Final Destination is also where the player battles Giant Bowser in Adventure mode. If the right conditions are met, the player is also be able to battle Giga Bowser afterwards.

In Super Smash Bros. Brawl, the stage is available from the start. Like in the past titles, it is a simple platform. In The Subspace Emissary, a Final Destination-like stage is the location of the final battle with Tabuu.

Final Destination returns in Super Smash Bros. for Nintendo 3DS/Wii U, with a different look. Like Brawl, it features a background that takes place in space. It should also be noted that every stage has an alternate Final Destination incarnation. Also, in a new mode of online play, For Glory mode, these versions of the stages are the only stages available. Stages in their Final Destination form are stylized as Stage Name (Ω Form).

Final Destination returns again in Super Smash Bros. Ultimate. Its main platform now has the same length as Battlefield; additionally, all Ω-form stages are standardized to having the stage set on a large platform floating over an abyss like the original Final Destination, as opposed to a large pillar with walls leading down to the bottom as is the case with several Ω-form stages in the previous game. As of the version 8.1 update released on August 4, 2020, any song in the game can be played on this stage as well as on all three variations of Battlefield.[3]

In both Melee and Brawl, the unlock match for Ganondorf takes place here; in the former, this is also true of the unlock match for Mewtwo.

Songs[edit]

Super Smash Bros. Brawl[edit]

My Music[edit]
Name Source Credits Requirements
Final Destination Super Smash Bros. Brawl
Credits (Super Smash Bros.) Super Smash Bros. Arrangement Supervisor: Yusuke Takahama Clear Classic mode on Hard difficulty.
Opening (Super Smash Bros. Melee) Super Smash Bros. Melee Arrangement Supervisor: Kentaro Ishizaka Grab CD
Final Destination (Melee) Super Smash Bros. Melee Original Grab CD
Giga Bowser (Melee) Super Smash Bros. Melee Original Grab CD
Not in My Music[edit]
Name Source Credits Plays In
Hidden Mountain & Forest The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past Original Fight with Ganondorf

Super Smash Bros. for Nintendo 3DS[edit]

Name Source Credits
Final Destination Original Arrangement Supervisor: Torine
Composition: BANDAI NAMCO Studios Inc.
Arrangement: BANDAI NAMCO Studios Inc.
Menu (Melee): Ver. 2 Super Smash Bros. Melee Arrangement Supervisor: Nobuko Toda
Composition: HAL Laboratory, Inc.
Arrangement: FILM SCORE LLC

Super Smash Bros. for Wii U[edit]

Name Source Credits Requirements
Final Destination Original Arrangement Supervisor: Torine
Composition: BANDAI NAMCO Studios Inc.
Arrangement: BANDAI NAMCO Studios Inc.
Final Destination Ver. 2 Original Arrangement Supervisor: Junichi Nakatsuru
Composition: BANDAI NAMCO Studios Inc.
Arrangement: BANDAI NAMCO Studios Inc.
Master Hand Original Arrangement Supervisor: LindaAI-CUE
Composition: BANDAI NAMCO Studios Inc.
Arrangement: BANDAI NAMCO Studios Inc.
Menu (Melee): Ver. 2 Super Smash Bros. Melee Arrangement Supervisor: Nobuko Toda
Composition: HAL Laboratory, Inc.
Arrangement: FILM SCORE LLC
Credits (Super Smash Bros.) Super Smash Bros. Brawl
(Super Smash Bros.)
Arrangement Supervisor: Yusuke Takahama
Metal Battle (Melee) Super Smash Bros. Melee Original Collect CD
Final Destination (Melee) Super Smash Bros. Melee
Giga Bowser (Melee) Super Smash Bros. Melee
Final Destination (Brawl) Super Smash Bros. Brawl
Boss Battle Song 2 (Brawl) Super Smash Bros. Brawl
Master Core Original Arrangement Supervisor: LindaAI-CUE
Composition: BANDAI NAMCO Studios Inc.
Arrangement: BANDAI NAMCO Studios Inc.
Clear Classic at Intensity 5.5 or higher
Master Fortress: First Wave Original Arrangement Supervisor: LindaAI-CUE
Composition: BANDAI NAMCO Studios Inc.
Arrangement: BANDAI NAMCO Studios Inc.
Clear Solo Classic at intensity 8.0 with 2 characters
Master Fortress: Second Wave Original Arrangement Supervisor: LindaAI-CUE
Composition: BANDAI NAMCO Studios Inc.
Arrangement: BANDAI NAMCO Studios Inc.
Clear Solo Classic at intensity 8.0 with 3 characters

Gallery[edit]

Names in other languages[edit]

Language Name Meaning
Japanese 終点
Shūten
Endpoint
Chinese 終點 (Traditional)
终点 (Simplified)
Zhōngdiǎn
Endpoint
Dutch Eindstation Terminal Station (lit.: End Station)
French Destination Finale Final Destination
German Letzte Station Last Station
Italian Destinazione finale Final Destination
Korean 종점
Jongjeom
Terminus
Portuguese Destino Final Final Destination
Russian Последняя арена
Poslednyaya arena
Last Arena
Spanish Destino final Final Destination

References[edit]