Big Ape City

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Big Ape City is a recurring location within the Donkey Kong franchise, which is said to be near the center of Donkey Kong Island. The name "Big Ape City" may be pun of "The Big Apple", a nickname for New York City.

History[edit]

World
Big Ape City
BigApeCity.PNG
Appearance Donkey Kong Land
Levels 8
<< List of Worlds >>

Donkey Kong Land[edit]

Big Ape City is the final world of the Game Boy game Donkey Kong Land, where King K. Rool is ultimately fought. It is made up of eight stages, which share city-related themes such as high-rise buildings, construction sites, and blimps.

  1. Construction Site Fight
  2. Kong Krazy
  3. Balloon Barrage
  4. Fast Barrel Blast
  5. Skyscraper Caper
  6. Button Barrel Blast
  7. Oil Drum Slum
  8. K. Rool's Kingdom

Donkey Kong Country: Rumble in the Jungle[edit]

An illustration showing Donkey Kong, Diddy Kong and Cranky Kong, looking down towards Big Ape City.

In the 1995 chapter book Donkey Kong Country: Rumble in the Jungle, Big Ape City is said to have once been the largest city on Donkey Kong Island, and "the center of culture, entertainment and business". However, the city was gradually abandoned in favor of the surrounding caves, treetops and mountains. In the events of the book, Funky Kong flies over the city in his barrel plane with Diddy Kong, who sees smoke rising among the ruins of the city, although Funky doesn't wish to "go looking for trouble". After taking Diddy Kong back to his treehouse, Funky Kong flies over Big Ape City to pick up another passenger, although several flying pigs attack his plane and cause him to crash land. Donkey Kong, Diddy Kong and Cranky Kong decide to cross the island on foot. They use a cave route within a snow-capped mountain in order to reach the city.

Upon arrival, they find that the city has been taken over by Kremlings, who have re-established themselves following the destruction of their old factory in the previous novel. It is revealed that they are building a new, larger factory under the direction of King K. Rool, who wants it completed by the end of the week. The Kongs are afraid of the amount of pollution that the factory is releasing. They overhear that Funky Kong is being held inside of the factory, and they proceed to overcome the city's "beefed up security" in order to help Funky escape, and to disable the city's security system. Within the factory, the Kongs overcome various different Kremlings, including Kritter, Krusha, a Klap Trap and Rock Kroc. After Funky repairs the engine of his barrel plane, the Kongs use it to escape the factory. Before leaving, Donkey Kong and Diddy Kong infiltrate the city's zeppelin, which is the "command ship" of King K. Rool. They plant the ship with time-delayed TNT Barrels, before escaping the city in their barrel plane. From afar, the Kongs watch the ship fall onto the factory, destroying them both. Amused about their victory, the Kongs return to their treehouse.

Within the novel, Cranky Kong states that when he was Donkey Kong's age, Big Ape City was on the verge of being abandoned, as it was already "decaying and dangerous". Cranky also states that he has many memories of battling "a short plumber named Mario" within the city, which suggests that Big Ape City was where the Donkey Kong arcade game takes place.

Other appearances[edit]

The first actual world of Donkey Kong '94 was called Big-City, and is most likely the same location. A snippet of the manual says: "Travel by zeppelin to Donkey Kong's favorite stomping ground, Big City. The sight of that familiar skyline might bring back fond memories, but don't waste your time sightseeing when there are Kremlings around!" The strategy review in Nintendo Power further states this with a screenshot caption stating "Cranky used to roll barrels at a plumber in the construction site here", being a direct homage to the the original Donkey Kong arcade game.

Names in other languages[edit]

Language Name Meaning
Japanese 大都会
Daitokai
Megalopolis
Spanish Gran ciudad de los monos Literal translation