Tin-Can Condor

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This article is about the boss in Yoshi's Crafted World. For the stage it is fought in, see The Tin-Can Condor.
Tin-Can Condor
Tin-Can Condor from Yoshi's Crafted World.
First appearance Yoshi's Crafted World (2019)
“I'm gonna make bird feed outta you, bub!”
Kamek, Yoshi's Crafted World

The Tin-Can Condor is the first major boss in Yoshi's Crafted World. It is fought at the end of Big Paper Peak in the level named after it, The Tin-Can Condor. It starts out with a tin can for a body and a balloon for a head and has a Native American-inspired appearance, wearing a war bonnet-like piece and quillwork earrings. Kamek places craft materials on it and blows up the balloon, creating the Tin-Can Condor.

At the start of the fight, the Tin-Can Condor attacks by laying blue, spiky eggs that roll towards Yoshi. If Yoshi spits a magnet onto the Condor's can, the weight causes it to fall down with its bonnet coming off, revealing a white bandage. Yoshi can damage it by Ground Pounding on its head.

After it is hit once, the Tin-Can Condor pounds on the ground multiple times, then lays more spiky eggs. It then flies by with paper airplanes falling down that can hurt Yoshi. Yoshi can acquire another magnet by stealing it from any Little Mousers holding one that comes out of straws behind the stage.

The final phase is similar to the second one, but the eggs come in two more colors: yellow, which bounces, and red, which rolls fast. The paper airplanes also come down in a different pattern. After one last hit, the Tin-Can Condor is defeated and rolls off the stage.

Kamek controls his own version of the Tin-Can Condor at the start of the stage Kamek Kerfuffle.

Gallery[edit]

Names in other languages[edit]

Language Name Meaning
Japanese あきかんバード
Aki-kan Bādo
Empty Can Bird
Chinese 空罐飞鸟 (Simplified)
空罐飛鳥 (Traditional)
Kōngguàn Fēiniǎo
Empty Can Flying Bird
French Alucondor Pun on "aluminium" and "condor"
Italian Lattinello Tin-othy; from "lattina" (tin can)
Spanish Aguilata Pun on águila (eagle) and lata (tin)