Jerry

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This article is about Luigi's Bob-omb partner in Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door. For information about the Magikoopa minion from Mario & Luigi: Bowser's Inside Story, see here.
Jerry
Jerry.PNG
Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door sprite for Jerry
Species Bob-omb
First Appearance Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door (2004)

“Sorry I sound so down, but you would be too if you saw Luigi dressed as a bride.”
Jerry, Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door

Jerry is a Bob-omb in Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door. His name rhymes with "cherry", to which he bears a resemblance as he is red in color with a fuse like a cherry stem. This could refer to a type of firework known as a cherry bomb, though it also follows the food-theme of Jerry's homeland, the Waffle Kingdom.

Jerry is the second partner that joins Luigi on his adventure to rescue Princess Eclair. Luigi and Jerry travel to Plumpbelly Village, where Luigi dresses up as a bride so that he can be offered to a two-headed snake as a sacrifice. They defeat the snake, and Jerry accompanies Luigi to make sure no one has to witness the horror of seeing Luigi in a dress ever again.

Quotes[edit]

  • Goombella: "That's Jerry, Luigi's Bob-omb buddy. He's a little different from most Bob-ombs. He's really burning with a righteous fire, and I think he's seen some...horrible...things. Speaking of which, I wonder if I'll ever be a bride... Hee hee hee hee hee!"
  • Jerry: "Hi, I guess. I'm Jerry. I'm a Bob-omb from Plumpbelly Village. Nice to meet you. Sorry I sound so down, but you would be too if you saw Luigi dressed as a bride. I'm serious. It scared me. It was honestly scarier than that giant snake-thing. I feel I now have a moral duty to stop Luigi from ever dressing as a bride again. I have to protect the world from my fate. That's why I'm sticking close to this guy."

Names in other languages[edit]

Language Name Meaning
Japanese チェリー
Cherī
Cherry
French Boberise Portmanteau of "Bob-omb" and "cerise" (cherry)
Italian Gina From "ciliegina" (little cherry)